Sunday Lesson: Family History Stories

CONDUCTING A LIVE DEMONSTRATION


Live Demonstration of Photos and Stories Feature at FamilySearch

Elder David A. Bednar has said that the first step in learning something is to “act upon it.”  When members do so, they learn more quickly and become deeply engaged in the subject.  The following is a learn-by-doing activity where members can discover and “act upon” information about their ancestors on FamilySearch.org.

During this activity, you will ask a volunteer from the audience to sign in to FamilySearch.org and discover photos and stories that have been posted about his or her ancestors. You will also invite class members to follow along on their mobile devices. This demonstration is a powerful way to help members connect with their ancestors and begin turning their hearts towards them.

Preparation for the Activity

Prior to the lesson, encourage members to bring a mobile device (laptop, tablet, phone, etc.) to the class. Remind them to get an LDS Account and password and bring them to the meeting.

Ask a ward or stake technology specialist to attend the class and help volunteers connect their devices to the video projector. This activity works best in facilities where multiple members can connect to the Internet at the same time. 

Introduction

Begin by showing the video It’s about the Dash.  Afterwards, explain that you would like members to have a heart-turning experience just like Elder Foster did.

Ask for a volunteer to help with the presentation.  Make sure the volunteer--

  • Has an LDS Account and password.
  • Has not been to FamilySearch.org in the past 4 or 5 weeks.
  • Has multiple generations in Family Tree.

Have the ward or stake technology specialist help the volunteer connect his or her device to the video projector. 

Ask the volunteer and class to sign in to FamilySearch.org with their devices.

Note: If the volunteer has problems signing in, you may need to ask some of the class members to log off and try signing in after the volunteer gets on.

Signing in to FamilySearch.org

  1. Log onto: www.LDS.org. 
  2. Find and click on the FamilySearch.org link.
  3. At FamilySearch.org, click on the Photos icon. 
  4. Sign in to FamilySearch.org.  This requires an LDS Account and password.

Photos  of our Ancestors

  1. Have the volunteer and class click on the People link.   
    Explain that this is where a member can see all the photos of people that have been added to the member’s family tree.
  2. Discuss the features in red.
  3. Encourage the volunteer and class members to take a few minutes to explore this feature.
  4. Ask the volunteer to share his or her feelings about the photos.
    Q:  Are you surprised at the number of photos that are on FamilySearch?
    Q:  How do you feel when you see a photo of an ancestor?
    Q:  Are you glad that people have posted these photos? Why?
    Q:  Do you have any photos at home that you could post of FamilySearch and share them with others?
  5. Next, ask the class members to share their feelings about the photos they discovered. 
  6. Have the volunteer and class members click on the My Photos link. Explain that this is where the photos that the member posts will be displayed.

Stories about Our Ancestors

  1. Have the volunteer and class members click on the Stories link. Explain that members can enter stories about their ancestors.  Stories are a powerful way to help us turn our hearts to our ancestors.
  2. Discuss the points in red.
  3. Have the volunteer and members take a few minutes and read some of the stories that are posted. Then ask the volunteer and class members to share their feelings about the stories.
    Q: How do stories make you feel about your ancestor?
    Q:  Did you learn anything new about your ancestors from the story?
    Q:  Do you have stories about you or your ancestors that you could add to FamilySearch?

End the activity by encouraging the class to use FamilySearch.org and the Photos and Stories features to preserve information about themselves and their ancestors for future generations.