BYUtv to Air Documentary on Tabernacle Choir’s Music and the Spoken Word

  • 25 October 2011
Date
25 October 2011

BYUtv will air a 30-minute documentary about the longest-running continuous radio and TV broadcast, Music and the Spoken Word, on Tuesday, October 25, and Wednesday, October 26.

Article Highlights

  • BYUtv will air the documentary, in English only, on October 25 at 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. and on October 26 at 1:30 a.m. All show times are mountain daylight time.
  • The Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s Music and the Spoken Word is considered the longest-running continuous radio and TV broadcast in the world.

“It truly is amazing that this broadcast has aired for all of these many years, and it just keeps getting better and better. The quality of the broadcast, the music, the orchestra, the production—all of it together—just keeps getting better. We are truly blessed to be a part of it.” —Mac Christensen, Mormon Tabernacle Choir president

Many are familiar with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s Music and the Spoken Word, a live radio and TV show broadcast weekly since 1929 “from the crossroads of the West” in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. But many are not acquainted with the whirlwind of work needed to produce such a show.

To highlight the preparation needed to broadcast the program, BYUtv will air on Tuesday and Wednesday a 30-minute documentary called Music and the Spoken Word: A Week in the Life. The program will air on October 25 and 26, and will be available by satellite, cable, and Internet channels.

The program, which is available in English only, will air at 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. on October 25 and at 1:30 a.m. on October 26. All times listed are mountain daylight time.

The documentary highlights the preparations the choir makes throughout the week to plan and produce each show.

Mac Christensen, president of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, said that while live television—with a live audience—is becoming a rarity today, Music and the Spoken Word is going strong after 83 years. The show is considered to be the longest-running continuous recording in radio history.

“It truly is amazing that this broadcast has aired for all of these many years,” said Brother Christensen, “and it just keeps getting better and better. The quality of the broadcast, the music, the orchestra, the production—all of it together—just keeps getting better. We are truly blessed to be a part of it.”

Viewers can watch the documentary live at no charge during the listed show times at byutv.org/watch.