October Lecture to Tell Story of British Housewife Humanitarian

  • October 8, 2015
Date
October 8, 2015
Location
Assembly Hall on Temple Square

 Carol Gray found a vocation in international aid while watching television. News coverage of civil war in former Yugoslavia depicted extreme suffering and devastation; she wept as she watched. She also prayed and began to organize relief supplies.

Article Highlights

  • The presenter will be Kate Holbrook, a specialist in women’s history in the Church History Department.
  • The focus of the lecture is the life and service of Carol Gray, a British housewife, and her impact on war-torn Yugoslavia.

“Her expression of love was as essential to the people she served as were physical supplies. She willingly risked injury, disease, and discomfiture to deliver that priceless commodity.” —Kate Holbrook, specialist in women’s history in the LDS Church History Department

The LDS Church History Library will host a Pioneers in Every Land lecture titled “Housewife in a Foreign War Zone” on Thursday, October 8, 2015, at 7:00 p.m. in the Assembly Hall on Temple Square. The presenter will be Kate Holbrook, a specialist in women’s history in the Church History Department.

The focus of the lecture is the life and service of Carol Gray. Gray, a housewife, mother of seven, and Relief Society president in the Sheffield England 2nd Ward, found a vocation in international aid while watching television. “News coverage of civil war in former Yugoslavia depicted extreme suffering and devastation; she wept as she watched. She also prayed and began to organize relief supplies,” explains Holbrook.

By November 1992, her 20-year-old daughter, Sammy, had joined her mission. They distributed relief supplies to front-line crisis areas in Croatia and Bosnia, a trip Gray would repeat dozens of times in the following decade. The visits gave her added purpose and determination to extend the love of Christ to her suffering brothers and sisters. Through her experiences, she discovered that “her expression of love was as essential to the people she served as were physical supplies. She willingly risked injury, disease, and discomfiture to deliver that priceless commodity,” Holbrook said.  

Kate Holbrook writes, studies, and interprets history full-time. She holds a master’s degree in world religions from Harvard Divinity School and a PhD in religion and society from Boston University. She was voted Harvard College’s Teaching Fellow of the Year for her work in a course that enrolled nearly 600 students. She later coedited Global Values 101: A Short Course, based on that class. Holbrook’s published work includes journal articles and chapters in edited volumes for university presses such as Oxford and Columbia. Two of her most recent books will be published next spring: The First Fifty Years of Relief Society: Key Documents in Latter-day Saint Women’s History and Women and Mormonism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, both of which she coedited.

This free lecture is part of the 2015 Pioneers in Every Land Lecture Series sponsored by the Church History Library. Lectures are held the second Thursday of every month at 7:00 p.m. in the Assembly Hall on Temple Square, 50 North West Temple Street. Limited free parking is provided at the Conference Center for those attending this event. Parking may fill quickly and is not guaranteed. As an alternative to parking downtown, please use the UTA transit system.

For those who cannot attend, lecture highlights will eventually be available on history.lds.org after the lecture. All previous lectures from past years are also available on this site. For more information, or to download a brochure listing all this year’s lectures, please go to the website history.lds.org or call 1-801-240-2272.