Los Angeles Visitors’ Center Memorializes 9/11

Contributed By Jan Hemming, Church News contributor

  • 12 September 2015

The events and aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy are memorialized on September 11 at the Los Angeles Visitors’ Center as hundreds pay tribute to local fire, police, and sheriff’s officers and watch the premiere of a new musical production, America Nine-Eleven.  Photo by Bob McKenny.

LOS ANGELES, CALIF.

The events and aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy were memorialized at the Los Angeles Visitors’ Center as hundreds paid tribute to local fire, police, and sheriff’s officers and watched the premiere of a new musical production, America Nine-Eleven.

The events and aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy are memorialized on September 11 at the Los Angeles Visitors’ Center as hundreds pay tribute to local fire, police, and sheriff’s officers and watch the premiere of a new musical production, America Nine-Eleven. Photo by Bob McKenny.

 

Two top executives in Southern California’s protective services—Commander Mark A. McCorkle, of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, and Deputy Chief Joseph Castro, of the Los Angeles Fire Department—spoke about the heroism of the first responders on the fateful day in 2001 in New York City. The Los Angeles police and fire departments were represented by six officers who received special certificates of commendation. As those awards were distributed, the audience spontaneously arose to give them a thunderous and sustained standing ovation.

Chris Severn, director of America Nine-Eleven, a three-act play depicting the heroism and courage of those involved and affected by 9/11, said he was compelled to write the play “to unify our country because it’s very divided right now.” He also hoped that it would help people be “more introspective—to examine what we’re doing with our time and our life.” A member of the Church in Thousand Oaks, California, Brother Severn said he was touched when Ambassador and former U.S. Congresswoman Diane Watson, a guest at the evening performance, told him afterwards, “I am so grateful you have done this. The rest of the country needs to see this.”

A cast of 24 along with the Los Robles Children’s Choir and a piano, cello, violin, and guitar ensemble performed in the play. Michael Babbit, also from Thousand Oaks, California, who played the role of a fire chief, said performing in America Nine-Eleven brought “back all the original emotions he felt 14 years ago—bewilderment, shock, and fear.” But it also gave him a great sense of “gratitude for those who sacrificed their lives for others.”

The events and aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy are memorialized on September 11 at the Los Angeles Visitors’ Center as hundreds pay tribute to local fire, police, and sheriff’s officers and watch the premiere of a new musical production, America Nine-Eleven. Photo by Bob McKenny.

Sister missionaries participate in an event on September 11 at the Los Angeles Visitors’ Center where hundreds paid tribute to local fire, police, and sheriff’s officers and watched the premiere of a new musical production, America Nine-Eleven. Photo by Bob McKenny.

Engine 37 firefighters from Westwood receive special certificates of appreciation on September 11 during an event memorializing the events and aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy at the Los Angeles Visitors’ Center. Photo by Bob McKenny.

Sister missionaries stand by Engine 37 from Westwood, the firefighters who received special certificates of appreciation. Photo by Jan Hemming.

Los Angeles Fire Department Deputy Chief Joseph Castro (left) and LA County Sheriff Commander Mark A. McCorkle participate in events at the Los Angeles Temple Visitors' Center memorializing the tragedy of 9/11. Photo by Jan Hemming.


Los Angeles Fire Department Deputy Chief Joseph Castro speaking during program at the Los Angeles Temple Visitors' Center memorializing the tragedy of 9/11. Photo by Jan Hemming.