LDSBC Devotional Focuses on Becoming “Whole-Soul” Latter-day Saints

Contributed By Emmy Gardiner, Church News staff writer

  • 10 January 2019

President Bruce C. Kusch, president of LDS Business College, and his wife, Sister Alynda Kusch, greet students arriving for the college devotional held in the Conference Center Theater on Thursday, January 8, 2019. Photo by Valerie Johnson.

Article Highlights

  • Come unto Christ, partake of the sacrament, offer your whole soul to Christ, and endure.
  • To change your heart, pray, listen to the prophet, and be obedient to the commandments.

“The scriptures are clear that the promised blessing of eternal life is contingent upon our enduring, in persevering, in living our lives with grit, commitment, and determination.” —Bruce Kusch, LDS Business College president

When LDS Business College President Bruce Kusch was a mission president, one of his sister missionaries came to a gathering with a worn-out shoe that was duct-taped together.

“For Sister Hoffman, those shoes represented who she was as a missionary. … She was offering her whole ‘sole’ as an offering and doing everything she could to make sure that those shoes endured to the end,” President Kusch said to LDSBC students gathered in the Conference Center Little Theater.

In their first devotional of 2019, President Kusch and his wife, Sister Alynda Kusch, spoke on the condition of hearts and souls.

While his wife focused her remarks on the state of the heart, President Kusch offered four of his own “whole-soul” invitations: come, partake, offer, endure.

Come

The Book of Mormon has over 40 invitations for us to “come unto Christ,” President Kusch said. Such admonitions suggest action, willingness, and humility. This process is not a “one-time event” but a “journey of a lifetime” as we come to accept the Savior’s teachings and become better disciples.

Partake

LDS Business College President Bruce C. Kusch speaks during a devotional in the Conference Center Theater on January 8, 2019. Photo by Valerie Johnson.

President Bruce C. Kusch, president of LDS Business College, and his wife, Sister Sister Alynda Kusch, greet students as they arrive for an LDS Business College devotional held in the Conference Center Theater on January 8, 2019.
Photo by Valerie Johnson.

Each week we are invited to partake of the sacrament, which represents the Savior’s power and redemption, President Kusch explained.

“In doing so, we act. We take. We eat. We drink. We promise. We commit. We renew.”

Offer

By accepting the invitation to offer our souls unto Christ, our role “transitions from partaker to giver,” President Kusch said.

This transition entails paying a price to God and cultivating a greater willingness to serve Him in a more personal, individual way. It’s important to offer a “broken heart and contrite spirit,” President Kusch said, and to do all that is possible to align one’s will with God’s.

Endure

The final step, President Kusch said, is to become a “whole soul” of Christ.

“It is a lifetime of correct decisions that make it possible for you and me to endure to the end. The scriptures are clear that the promised blessing of eternal life is contingent upon our enduring, in persevering, in living our lives with grit, commitment, and determination.”

Despite these necessary steps, President Kusch made one final distinction:

“Brothers and sisters, where you and I are on this continuum is probably not as important as how you and I feel about where we are and if we are making progress toward being a ‘whole-soul’ Latter-day Saint.”

LDS Business College President Bruce C. Kusch speaks during an LDSBC devotional held in the Conference Center Theater on January 8, 2019. Photo by Valerie Johnson.

A mighty change of heart

Explaining how her sister underwent reconstructive heart surgery at a young age to repair a pulmonary valve, Sister Kusch told the audience that they too could figuratively experience a mighty change of heart.

“What is the condition of your heart?” Sister Kusch asked. “Is it soft, so the Lord can teach and mold you, so He can help you? Or is it not? Are you compassionate, submissive, and willing, or are your tendencies more to being jealous, willful, and rebellious?”

Stating that having a hardened heart is a learned behavior, Sister Kusch gave the first steps toward changing one’s heart—praying, listening to the prophet, and being obedient to the commandments.

“If we look to Nephi as an example of what we can do, you will remember that he was first willing to follow his … father and keep the commandments of the Lord. We can do that. Nephi had a great desire to know and to believe. We can do that. With faith and humility he prayed to know. We can do that. As a result, he received divine guidance and it was the Lord that softened Nephi’s heart.”

Sister Kusch also asked the audience to consider the results of having a softened heart. Those benefits include being more believing, feeling the influence of the Holy Ghost and the Savior, and experiencing greater peace.

While these changes may seem intimidating, Sister Kusch suggested making small changes each day rather than seeking immediate perfection.

“Here is my invitation: Do something today to increase your faith. Do something today that will yield a changed heart.”

A photo of Sister Alynda Kusch and her sister is displayed as Sister Kusch speaks during the LDS Business College devotional in the Conference Center Theater on January 8, 2019. Photo by Valerie Johnson.

President Bruce C. Kusch, president of LDS Business College, and his wife, Sister Sister Alynda Kusch, greet a student as he arrives for an LDS Business College devotional held in the Conference Center Theater on January 8, 2019. Photo by Valerie Johnson.

With a backdrop showing a sister missionary’s worn-out shoe, LDS Business College President Bruce C. Kusch speaks during a devotional in the Conference Center Theater on January 8, 2019. Photo by Valerie Johnson.