President Eyring Rededicates Renovated Mexico City Temple

Contributed By Jason Swenson, Church News staff writer

  • 14 September 2015

President Henry B. Eyring of the First Presidency greets a sister as he leaves following the rededication of the Mexico City Temple September 13.

“You could feel remarkable faith and goodness of the people. Just being with them was a thrill.” —President Henry B. Eyring of the First Presidency

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

President Henry B. Eyring rededicated the Mexico City Mexico Temple—closed for almost two years and renovated—on Sunday, September 13.

“The [Mexican members] don’t have to do anything different from what they are doing,” he said after the rededication. “They have tremendous faith, and they are going to do great work here.”

Mexico, home to more than a million Latter-day Saints, has proven to be a power for the Church. And tens of thousands frequently worship in one of Mexico’s 12 temples. But many say the nation’s first temple—built with Mayan-influenced architecture in this sprawling capital city—remains a unique edifice.

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland and President Henry B. Eyring stand outside the Mexico City Mexico Temple. Photo by Jason Swensen.

Originally dedicated in 1983, the Mexico City Mexico Temple was rededicated on Sunday, September 13, 2015, by President Henry B. Eyring. Photo by Jason Swensen.

“This temple offers us all we really need in life,” said Jorge A. Rojas, a veteran LDS leader in Mexico.

Brother Rojas remembers attending the groundbreaking of the Mexico City Temple in 1979 and then returning four years later for its dedication. He and his wife, Marcella, live in the northern Mexican city of Monterrey. But he said attending the rededication Sunday was a must.

Originally opened in 1983, the Mexico City Mexico Temple was renovated and rededicated by President Thomas S. Monson for the first time in 2008. The recent changes focused primarily on upgrading interior features. Highlights include a new carpet carved with a Mesoamerican design in the celestial room and doors crafted from oak and cast bronze.

Latter-day Saints from the Mexico City temple district say they’ve been blessed during the refurbishing. Other temples in Mexico are relatively close and accessible, and many were able to attend with some frequency. Still, the reopening of the temple in Mexico City was cause for rejoicing.

“The Mexico City Temple is a part of me,” said 23-year-old Dario Gomez. “I grew up with this temple.”

President Eyring presided Sunday over the three dedicatory sessions. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles joined him. Other General Authorities in attendance were Elder Kent F. Richards of the Seventy and the Mexico Area Presidency: Elder Benjamín De Hoyos, Elder Paul B. Pieper, and Elder Arnulfo Valenzuela.

President Eyring said he won’t soon forget this key moment for the Church in Mexico.

“This was one of the great days of my life,” he said following the dedication. “You could feel remarkable faith and goodness of the people. Just being with them was a thrill.” 

Latter-day Saints entered the Mexico City Temple for the rededication services held September 13. The temple has been closed for several months for extensive renovation.

(From left to right) Elder Kent F. Richards of the Seventy, Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency of the Church, were in Mexico City September 12 and 13 for the rededication of the Mexico City Temple.

Latter-day Saints participated in the rededication of the Mexico City Temple by President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency of the Church.

President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, greeted members of the Church near the Mexico City Temple. He rededicated the temple on September 13, 2015.

Mexican Latter-day Saints gather outside the Mexico City Mexico Temple following the edifice's September 13, 2015, rededication. The temple was the first of its kind in Mexico. Photo by Jason Swensen.