Relief Society Participates in the Work of Salvation

Contributed By Sarah Jane Weaver, Church News associate editor

  • 6 May 2015

Sisters in the Relief Society are organized to accomplish the work of the Relief Society and the work of salvation.

Article Highlights

  • The purpose of Relief Society is to learn, work, and give loving service.
  • A man relates how the Relief Society helped his family recuperate after his mother’s death.

“I shall never forget that Christlike service; I shall never cease to be grateful to women who can step in and hold a broken family together with a mother’s love in every action and word.”

Sisters in the Relief Society are organized to accomplish the work of the Relief Society and the work of salvation. In former years they would gather in “work meetings” to learn, work, and give loving service together as their efforts extended far beyond their meetings.

One successful businessman shared the loving service his family received in their time of need:

“When I was six years old my mother died, leaving my hard-working father, who could afford no help, with six children under 12 years of age.”

“We children stood around bewildered, not able to understand the tragedy that had befallen us. My eldest sister cared for the baby as best she could, and the next oldest tried to care for the needs of the two-year-old. I remember well seeing two women come into the home, dressed for kitchen work, which they, in a cheerful manner, immediately became interested in. They prepared a meal and did all kinds of household duties. … After a few days we became accustomed to seeing these efficient women doing everything necessary for a family of seven.

“Week after week as we ran home from school, we would find someone there to greet us, and the aroma of freshly baked bread on the kitchen table whetted our … appetites. We all had clean, mended clothes to wear, and never felt different from other children. The pained look on my father’s face would disappear as he stepped across the door sill and realized the heroic efforts of these noble neighbors to keep our home and family together. My father, taking courage from the wholesome attitude they took, became a playmate and a pal to us children.

“After a year or so my father was able to re-establish his home, and assume his full responsibility in caring for his home and family. I shall never forget that Christlike service; I shall never cease to be grateful to women who can step in and hold a broken family together with a mother’s love in every action and word.”

Today, the work of Relief Society is still carried out by sisters who meet together in various ways to increase faith, strengthen homes and families, and help those in need.

—Story taken from The National Woman’s Relief Society (1932), 6.