RootsTech 2011 Conference Presentations Available Online

  • 24 March 2011

Article Highlights

  • Six video presentations from the 2011 RootsTech Conference are available at no cost at rootstech.familysearch.org.

“We’ve put the videos of the keynotes and other presentations online for free to give others a chance to share in the RootsTech experiences—to give them a taste of what they can expect for 2012.”

—Anne Roach, RootsTech conference chair

Those who missed the inaugural 2011 RootsTech technology and family history conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, in February can now watch the keynote address and a few other popular presentations online at rootstech.familysearch.org.

“We’ve put the videos of the keynotes and other presentations online for free to give others a chance to share in the RootsTech experiences—to give them a taste of what they can expect for 2012,” said Anne Roach, RootsTech conference chair.

Recorded presentations include:

  • Jay Verkler, CEO, FamilySearch International: “RootsTech: Turning Roots, Branches, Trees into Nodes, Links, Graphs”
  • Barry Ewell, founder, Mygenshare.com: “Digitally Preserving Your Family Heritage”
  • Curt Witcher, manager, Historical Genealogy Department, Allen County (Indiana) Public Library: “Exploring Emerging Technologies”
  • Brian Pugh, senior engineer, FamilySearch International: “Cloud Computing: What It Is and How We Used It to Build FamilySearch.org”
  • Thomas MacEntee, founder, High-Definition Genealogy: “Shape the Future of Family History”
  • Brewster Kahle, founder, The Internet Archive: “Connect and Collaborate”

RootsTech is a conference designed to bring technologists and genealogists together to learn from each other and find solutions to the challenges associated with family history research. The conference focuses on content that will help genealogists discover new research tools while enabling technology creators to learn the latest development techniques.

In addition to the six video presentations available on the RootsTech website, visitors can watch video interviews and other conference speakers and developers at Genealogy Gems on YouTube.

With more than 3,000 in-person attendees from 32 states and 15 countries—some coming from as far away as China, New Zealand, Australia, Namibia, and Israel—and another 4,500 attending remotely over the Internet, the conference was one of the largest genealogy-related conferences ever held in the United States.

The RootsTech 2012 conference is scheduled for February 2–4 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.