Young Women Leaders Emphasize Living Virtuously

  • 27 March 2011

Article Highlights

  • Elaine S. Dalton, president, spoke about virtue
  • Mary N. Cook, first counselor, spoke about benevolence
  • Ann M. Dibb, second counselor, spoke about being true and being honest

“Now and for the rest of your lives, you will need that living and growing testimony to fortify you and lead your path to eternal life. And with it you will become the transmitters of the Light of Christ to your brothers and sisters across the world and across generations.” —President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency

During Saturday’s general Young Women meeting, leaders from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints emphasized principles from the thirteenth article of faith and counseled young women to live virtuous, testimony-filled lives.

President Eyring

President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, spoke to the Young Women on behalf of the First Presidency. “You are the bright hope of the Lord’s Church,” he said. “If that belief can become a deep testimony from God, it will shape your daily and hourly choices.”

President Eyring offered counsel on gaining and strengthening testimonies.

“Now and for the rest of your lives, you will need that living and growing testimony to fortify you and lead your path to eternal life,” he said. “And with it you will become the transmitters of the Light of Christ to your brothers and sisters across the world and across generations.”

He stressed that testimony grows gradually as parts of the whole truth of the gospel are confirmed. He cited the formula for gaining faith found in Alma 32—begin with a desire and then nurture the seed of faith.

He reminded young women to continually utilize the promise in Moroni 10:4 to keep their testimonies strong: “And when ye shall receive these things, I would exhort you that ye would ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if these things are not true; and if ye shall ask with a sincere heart, with real intent, having faith in Christ, he will manifest the truth of it unto you, by the power of the Holy Ghost.”

“You will be light to the world as you share your testimony with others,” President Eyring said. “You will reflect to them the Light of Christ in your life. The Lord will find ways for that light to touch those close to you. And through the combined faith and testimony of His daughters, God will touch the lives of millions in His kingdom and across the world with His light.”

Sister Dalton

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women general president, counseled young women to walk in the paths of virtue and cleave unto [their] covenants.

“You must stand guard of yourself, your family, and all those with whom you associate,” she emphasized. “As a guardian of virtue, you will protect, shield, and defend moral purity because the power to create mortal life is a sacred and exalted power and must be safeguarded until you are married.”

Sister Dalton drew an analogy between staying virtuous and a 22-mile hike some young women made from the Draper Utah Temple to the Salt Lake Temple, with the guidance and help of their leaders.

“Your course is marked, and you can be assured that the Savior has not only walked the course but will again walk it with you—every step of the way,” she said.

She counseled young women to make a commitment by keeping and living a list of things they will always do and things they will never do.

“As you guard your virtue and purity, you will be given strength,” Sister Dalton said in closing. “As you keep the covenants you have made, the Holy Ghost will guide and guard you. You will be surrounded by heavenly hosts of angels.”

Sister Cook

First counselor in the Young Women general presidency Mary N. Cook addressed those in attendance concerning the topic of benevolence, a principle listed in the thirteenth article of faith, which is the 2011 Mutual theme.

The root of the word “benevolent” means “to wish someone well.”

“To be benevolent is to be kind, well meaning, and charitable,” Sister Cook expounded.

Using Christ as the ultimate example of kindness, Sister Cook explained that benevolence helps build spiritual unity and peace, and also allows us to share our unique characteristics. 

Sister Cook cited the story of the good Samaritan and invited every young woman to change the world through their own Samaritan-like acts to old and young, family and friends, big and small.

“I promise that if you will extend yourself beyond what is easy to do, you will feel so good inside that kindness will become a part of your everyday life,” she said. You’ll see that benevolence can bring joy and unity to your home, your class, your ward, and your school. Remember this: kindness begins with me.”

Sister Dibb

Ann M. Dibb, second counselor in the Young Women general presidency, focused her comments on other principles from the thirteenth article of faith—being honest and being true.

In addition to enabling us to have the companionship of the Holy Ghost, being honest in all things, big and small, lets us experience peace of mind and a clear conscience, Sister Dibb said. In addition, our relationships are enriched because they are based on trust.

Sister Dibb defined being true as being “steadfast,” “loyal,” “accurate,” or “without deviation.”

“Being true allows us to have a positive effect on the lives of others,” Sister Dibb said.