The Seventies: A Historical Perspective


On Friday, October 5, 1975, as the 145th Semiannual General Conference of the Church began, President Spencer W. Kimball informed the Church that Elder Gene R. Cook had been chosen to fill the vacancy in the First Council of the Seventy created by the death of Elder Milton R. Hunter. He then went on to state that the First Quorum of Seventy is once more organized, and he named Elders Charles A. Didier, William Rawsel Bradford, and George Patrick Lee as members of that quorum. He also announced that these three brethren would be General Authorities of the Church. He indicated that bringing the quorum to its full strength of seventy members may result from need. The announcement was a source of great joy to the seventies and other members of the Church.

Many members not conversant with Church history have wondered if there was ever a First Quorum or why there is a First Council.

There was a First Quorum. It was organized February 28, 1835, just following the calling and organizing of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Both of these quorums, one of twelve members, the other of seventy, were formed from men who had been on the Zion’s Camp march from Kirtland, Ohio, to Missouri in 1834, a total round-trip distance of about 1,800 miles on foot. These men had offered their lives, if necessary, to rescue Zion from the mobs which had driven out the Saints. They had shown their loyalty and devotion, and their sacrifice had been accepted.

The seventy were first mentioned by the Prophet Joseph Smith one Sunday afternoon to Brigham and Joseph Young, whose voices raised together in song were pleasing to the Prophet. He listened to them for a while, then told Brigham to call a meeting of the Church for the following Saturday when he would organize the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; and said he: “Brigham, you are to be one of them.” Turning to Joseph Young, he said: “And you are to be a president of the seventy.”

At that time, no one had any idea of what a seventy was or how an organization of them was to be effected. They knew only the references in the Bible where the Lord sent out “other seventy” who had returned rejoicing (see Luke 10:1–17), and where an organization of seventy men was organized under Moses (see Ex. 24:1, 9; Num. 11:16). It was indeed a startling thing for them to learn that there were to be seventy men with a missionary calling, that their presidents should be seven in number. They were to assist the Twelve in preaching the gospel and in regulating the Church in all the world. (See D&C 107:25, 34.)

On February 28, 1835, seven presidents were chosen to preside over the quorum. In order of their choosing, they were: Hazen Aldrich, Joseph Young, Levi Ward Hancock, Leonard Rich, Zebedee Coltrin, Lyman Royal Sherman, and Sylvester Smith.

The Prophet also organized 2 1/2 more quorums of seventy, making a total of 3 1/2 quorums. They were presided over by the presidents of the First Quorum.

It was understood that the seventy were to be generally free of local responsibility so that they could preach the gospel under direction of the Twelve to the ends of the earth. Many of them did just that.

In early 1838 the Church leaders left Kirtland, their lives threatened by a wave of apostate brethren. Loyal Saints followed after them as best they could. The seventy organized a company to journey by wagon to Far West, Missouri, and the whole of the quorum and their families, with many other Saints joining them, formed a caravan—called the Kirtland Camp—to make the journey. Their membership and discipline thus far had taught them loyalty, so that in spite of differences among them most of them stayed together until they reached Missouri. During a portion of the march, they stopped long enough to contract a road-building job. This was completed and the money was used to purchase much needed supplies for their journey. It took much of the spring and summer to make the journey. It was the first united effort of the Saints to pioneer their way.

A portion of the company stopped at Haun’s Mill, just twenty miles outside Far West, Missouri, on Shoal Creek. While they rested there late one afternoon, a mob of about 200 men descended upon them, indiscriminately killing all they could find. Joseph Young was in a cabin with his wife and small daughter and infant son Seymour B. when the mob rode in. His wife entreated him to run and hide, saying that they would not kills her or the babies, but they would kill him. So he ran through the hazel brush and over a hill, hiding until the mob was gone. Eighteen were killed in that massacre which the mobbers called a “battle.” Burial of the victims was in an old well.

There was not much for the seventy as an organization to do for the next year except to personally survive the threats and attacks of the Missouri mobbers.

In 1839 the Saints, driven from Far West, reassembled at Quincy, Illinois, and later at a swampy town on a bend of the Mississippi River named Commerce. The Prophet later named it Nauvoo, which he said meant “beautiful,” and from then on beautiful it began to be. There the seventies constructed the largest hall in Nauvoo, the second floor of which was given over to a library and room of learning. Books collected from all parts of the world where missionaries were sent were kept in the library, and classes, debates, and discussions were held in the large hall. The seventy were known as seekers of knowledge as well as preachers of the gospel. One reading the diaries of these men realizes that they took seriously the office of seventy. Their missionary labors were phenomenal.

Then came the martyrdom. This was a time of testing. Many false leaders arose claiming revelation as to who should lead the Church. Most of the seventies stood loyal to President Brigham Young and the Twelve. Even though the Church was beset with the problems which arose because of the mobbers’ efforts to drive them out, there was time taken to consider the things of the kingdom; the building of the temple continued at an accelerated pace.

The seventies were also expanded. The Twelve increased the quorums from 3 1/2 to ten, and the members of the First Quorum, sixty-three in number, were divided into nine groups of seven each (9 x 7 = 63) to serve as presidents of the nine other quorums. The presidency of the First Quorum presided over them all and over the First Quorum as well. It was decided that when the First Quorum should meet, the presidents of the ten quorums would form the First Quorum. After that decision was implemented, quorums of seventy were formed with fair rapidity. Membership in the quorums was maintained rigidly; that is, if a man was a member of the fourth quorum, he stayed there unless chosen to fill a vacancy in the third, and from the third to the second, and so on.

During the period of exodus from Nauvoo, the seventies quorum was left in charge of and supervised temple ceremonies. Joseph Young, the senior president, supervised this work and presided in the temple. Many members of the quorums were on missions of varying lengths.

As the members trudged their weary way across Iowa in 1846, the call to the Mormon Battalion took some of them. One of the original first seven presidents, Levi W. Hancock, went on this march. In research from Nauvoo’s seventies’ records, Brother William G. Hartley, assistant Church historian, notes that: “more than one-third of the Mormon Battalion consisted of seventies drawn from more than thirty separate quorums. They reformed into one ‘mass’ quorum in Los Angeles on April 18, 1847, electing their own seven presidents under the direction of Levi W. Hancock.”

In common with all the migrating members, the seventies had to get their families to the valley of the Great Salt Lake. About one-half of the men in the pioneering company which led out in 1847 were seventies. One would expect the seventies to lead out, for they were mostly young men in their late twenties and early thirties when they were ordained in 1845.

Upon reaching the valley, the families of Saints were sent out to settle in the many valleys of the mountains without regard to offices held in the priesthood. No matter where a man settled he still was counted in his original quorum. Consequently, in any settlement there might live twenty seventies, none of whom belonged to the same quorum. There is record of a father and a son, both seventies, living in the same house but belonging to different quorums. Therefore, it was almost impossible to gather a quorum under the auspices of its own officers. This did not stop the cultural efforts of those who were in the territory; they nurtured the idea that education made better missionaries. Plans were drawn for a new seventies hall. Money was raised for the building, but the project was abandoned when President Young asked the seventies to bend their efforts toward the construction of the temple.

In his research on the seventies, Brother Hartley has pointed out that “despite quorum identity problems, seventies still provided two-thirds of all missionaries called to foreign missions. As new seventies were ordained, they were usually assigned to existing quorums; consequently, between 1846 and 1856, only six new quorums were organized. … (Of the 2,200 seventies ordained between 1835 and 1855, between one-third and one-half were foreign born, England alone providing no less than 500.) Then in 1857, sixteen new quorums were organized, probably as a result of the Mormon Reformation just ending.” (The Mormon Reformation was a movement in the 1850s spearheaded by Jedediah M. Grant, second counselor in the First Presidency, to inspire rededication among the Saints.)

This disorganized state could continue only as long as settling the land and growing enough food to keep from starving was the chief concern. In 1877, just before his death, President Brigham Young went through the Church and organized the stakes of Zion. One of the early acts of President John Taylor was to reorganize the quorums of seventy along stake lines. Men living in a stake would have membership in the quorum organized in that stake. If they moved to another stake, their quorum membership was changed to that stake. This brought order out of the chaos and is an example of the Church outgrowing its own initial organization.

President Taylor also gave attention to the First Quorum. In a statement approved by the Lord, he said that the First Quorum, should it be necessary to meet, could consist of the senior presidents of the first sixty-three quorums. However, the First Quorum never did meet on this basis, and this order of organization was not carried out—a fact that would indicate that the leaders of the day felt no need for the First Quorum to operate the missions of the Church or for the seventies to perform any other function than serving on missions as individuals. As a result, ward and stake leaders began to place the seventies in assignments as local officers and teachers.

Up until 1909 the seventies met in their own quorums—separately from the rest of the ward and stake priesthood—for study and improvement, but thereafter they were instructed to meet as seventies in groups in their own wards. At about this time the study manuals of the Melchizedek Priesthood quorums became those of the seventy also. Before that time the seventies studied special texts written by President Brigham H. Roberts.

In about 1912 President Frank Y. Taylor of the Granite Stake reflected that the gentiles in our midst might be proselyted in the same manner as they were in areas away from Utah. He organized the Granite Stake Mission and patterned it after the full-time missions. There was a mission president and missionaries were working two by two in the stake. The stake at that time covered a large area from about 17th South in Salt Lake City to about 70th South and from the eastern mountains to the western hills. It could be that some other stake started sooner than this, but so far as we know, this was the first stake mission organized.

In 1935 the First Council of the Seventy was charged with the organization of stake missions. A common program was organized. The mission presidents were generally chosen from local seventies quorums, and the quorum members were called out from ward work to serve as missionaries. However, the work was not given to quorums but to individual members, as the stake president felt to call them.

The First Council supervised this work until 1952, when in a meeting held in the president’s office, President David O. McKay released the First Council from this work and assigned it to President Stephen L Richards, his counselor in the First Presidency. President Richards organized a committee to handle stake mission work, to which were called Presidents Antoine R. Ivins and Bruce R. McConkie. This committee functioned under various chairmen until the mid-1960s when the stake mission presidencies were formed from three members of the local quorum council, and seventies began to be called to labor once more.

Recently President Spencer W. Kimball has appointed the quorums of seventy to be the stake mission organizations, under the presidency of all seven of the presidents. It was made clear that seventies were missionaries by virtue of their ordination and need not be set apart as such; they could be appointed teachers or finders as circumstances warranted.

In 1974, under the presidency of President Spencer W. Kimball, all seven presidents of the First Council were assigned to work with the Missionary Executive Committee under the chairmanship of President Ezra Taft Benson, President of the Council of the Twelve.

In 1975, in a reassignment of the duties of the General Authorities, the Council of the Twelve was appointed as the Missionary Committee of the Church, and a Missionary Executive Committee was appointed to handle the details of the work. Elders Howard W. Hunter and Bruce R. McConkie were appointed from the Twelve, and the seven presidents from the First Council were invited to meet with them.

The needs of the expanding missionary system have increased so rapidly as to make it apparent that there is now a need for the First Quorum of the Seventy. And so as we stated at the beginning, President Kimball organized the First Quorum at the October 1975 General Conference with ten members. He said this will be expanded as the need arises until finally there will be a general quorum of seventy.

Many seventies of the Church as individuals have given effective and valuable service to the Church. They have gone forth when called and filled missions, presided over missions, written histories and textbooks, and have raised funds to assist missionaries.

During the past few years, the seventies of the Church have undertaken to assist those living in foreign lands who could not go on missions without financial help. Generously they have contributed. No one who can qualify has been refused. More than 2,000 young men and women have been assisted. The amount spent has run into millions of dollars. At this moment more than 500 are on missions because of this help. Quorums of the elders and high priests and individuals have also contributed in many instances.

The work goes on. In more ways than one this is the decade of the seventies. The revelations say the seventy are to assist the Twelve in carrying forth the gospel. It is their determination to follow the instructions of the Twelve in their work until the entire world “shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea.” (Heb. 2:14.)

First Seven Presidents of the Seventy and First Council of the Seventy, 1835 to the Present

1. Hazen Aldrich—Set apart as one of the first seven presidents February 28, 1835; released April 6, 1837, having previously been ordained a high priest.

2. Joseph Young—Born April 7, 1797, at Hopkinton, Mass., to John Young and Abigail Howe. Ordained a seventy February 28, 1835, under the hands of Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams; set apart as one of the first seven presidents February 28, 1835, at age 37; died July 16, 1881, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Joseph Young

3. Levi Ward Hancock—Born April 7, 1803, at Springfield, Mass., to Thomas Hancock and Amy Ward. Ordained a seventy February 28, 1835, under the hands of Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams; set apart as one of the first seven presidents February 28, 1835, at age 31; released April 6, 1837, having supposedly previously been ordained a high priest; restored to his former place in the First Council September 3, 1837, because he had not been ordained a high priest; died June 10, 1882, at Washington, Utah.

Levi Ward Hancock

4. Leonard Rich—Set apart as one of the first seven presidents February 28, 1835; released April 6, 1837, having previously been ordained a high priest.

5. Zebedee Coltrin—Born Sept. 7, 1804, at Ovid, N.Y., to John Coltrin, Jr., and Sarah Graham. Set apart as one of the first seven presidents February 28, 1835, at age 30; released Apr. 6, 1837, having previously been ordained a high priest; died July 21, 1887, at Spanish Fork, Utah.

Zebedee Coltrin

6. Lyman Royal Sherman—Born May 22, 1804, at Salem, Mass., to Elkanah Sherman and Asenath Hulbert. Set apart as one of the first seven presidents February 28, 1835, at age 30; released Apr. 6, 1837, having previously been ordained a high priest; died Jan. 27, 1839.

7. Sylvester Smith—Set apart as one of the first seven presidents Feb. 28, 1835: released Apr. 6. 1837, having previously been ordained a high priest.

8. John Gould—Born May 11, 1808. Ordained a seventy and set apart as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1837, at age 28; released Sept. 3, 1837, to become a high priest.

9. James Foster—Born Apr. 1, 1775, at Morgan Co., Ind. Ordained a seventy Apr. 6, 1837, under the hands of Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum Smith; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1837, at age 62; died Dec. 21, 1841, at Morgan Co., Ill.

10. Daniel Sanborn Miles—Born July 23, 1772, at Sanbornton, N.H., to Josiah Miles and Marah Sanborn. Ordained a seventy Apr. 6, 1837, by Hazen Aldrich; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1837, at age 64; died in 1845, at Hancock Co., Ill.

11. Josiah Butterfield—Born Mar. 13 or 18, 1795, at Soco, Maine, to Abel Butterfield and Mary or Mercy ________. Ordained a seventy Apr. 6, 1837, under the hands of Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum Smith; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1837, at age 42; excommunicated Oct. 7, 1844; died at Monterey Co., Calif., Apr. 1871.

12. Salmon Gee—Born Oct. 16, 1792, at Lyme, Conn., to Zopher Gee and Esther Beckwith. Ordained a seventy Apr. 6, 1837, under the hands of Sidney Rigdon and Hyrum Smith; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1837, at age 44; fellowship withdrawn Mar. 6, 1838; died Sept. 13, 1845, at Ambrosia, Iowa.

13. John Gaylord—Born July 12, 1797, in Pennsylvania, to Chauncey Gaylord. Ordained a seventy Dec. 20, 1836, by Hazen Aldrich; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1837, at age 39; excommunicated Jan. 13, 1838; rejoined the Church at Nauvoo Oct. 5, 1839; died July 17, 1878.

14. Henry Harriman—Born June 9, 1804, at Rowley, Mass., to Enoch Harriman and Sarah Brocklebank. Ordained a seventy March 1835, under the hands of Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Feb. 6, 1838, at age 33; died May 17, 1891, at Huntington, Utah.

Henry Harriman

15. Zera Pulsipher—Born June 24, 1789, at Rockingham, Vt., to John Pulsipher and Elizabeth Dutton. Ordained a seventy Mar. 6, 1838, under the hands of Joseph Young and James Foster; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Mar. 6, 1838, at age 48; released Apr. 12, 1862; died Jan. 1, 1872, at Hebron, Utah.

Zera Pulsipher

Roger Orton was excommunicated Nov. 30, 1837; returned to the Church; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 7, 1845, but was never set apart and did not function; dropped from this position Oct. 6, 1845.

16. Albert Perry Rockwood—Born June 5, 1805, at Holliston, Mass., to Luther Rockwood and Ruth Perry. Ordained a seventy Jan. 5, 1839, under the hands of Joseph Young, Henry Harriman, and Zera Pulsipher; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Dec. 2, 1845, at age 40; died Nov. 26, 1879, at Sugar House, Utah.

Albert Perry Rockwood

17. Benjamin Lynn Clapp—Born Aug. 19, 1814, at West Huntsville, Ala., to Ludwig Lewis Clapp and Margaret Ann Loy. Ordained a seventy Oct. 20, 1844, under the hands of Joseph Young and Levi W. Hancock; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Dec. 2, 1845, at age 31; excommunicated Apr. 7, 1859; died in 1860 in California.

Benjamin Lynn Clapp

18. Jedediah Morgan Grant—Born Feb. 21, 1816, at Windsor, N.Y., to Joshua Grant and Athalia Howard. Ordained a seventy Feb. 28, 1835, under the hands of Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Dec. 2, 1845, at age 29; sustained as second counselor to President Brigham Young, Apr. 7, 1854.

Jedediah Morgan Grant

19. Horace Sunderlin Eldredge—Born Feb. 6, 1816, at Brutus, N.Y., to Alanson Eldredge and Esther Sunderlin. Ordained a seventy Oct. 13, 1844, by Joseph Young; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 7, 1854, at age 38; died Sept. 6, 1888, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Horace Sunderlin Eldredge

20. Jacob Gates—Born Mar. 9, 1811, at Saint Johnsbury, Vt., to Thomas Gates and Patty Plumley. Ordained a seventy Dec. 19, 1838, under the hands of Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 8, 1862, at age 51; died Apr. 14, 1892, at Provo, Utah.

Jacob Gates

21. John Van Cott—Born Sept. 7, 1814, at Canaan, N. Y., to Losee Van Cott and Lovinia Pratt. Ordained a seventy Feb. 25, 1847, by Joseph Young; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 8, 1862, at age 48; died Feb. 18, 1883, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

John Van Cott

22. William Whittaker Taylor—Born Sept. 11, 1853, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to John Taylor and Harriet Whittaker. Ordained a seventy Oct. 11, 1875, by Orson Pratt; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 7, 1880, at age 26; died Aug. 1, 1884, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

William Whittaker Taylor

23. Abraham Hoagland Cannon—Born Mar. 12, 1859, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to George Quayle Cannon and Elizabeth Hoagland. Ordained a seventy Oct. 9, 1882, by George Q. Cannon; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 8, 1882, at age 23; ordained an apostle Oct. 7, 1889.

Abraham Hoagland Cannon

Theodore Belden Lewis—Born Nov. 18, 1843, at St. Louis, Mo., to Thomas Anderson Lewis and Martha J. O. Belden. Ordained a high priest at Nephi, Utah (date not known); sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 8, 1882, at age 38. On Oct. 9, when he appeared to be set apart, he reported that he was a high priest, and so he was not set apart and did not function in this position.

24. Seymour Bicknell Young—Born Oct. 3, 1837, at Kirtland, Ohio, to Joseph Young and Jane Adeline Bicknell. Ordained a seventy Feb. 18, 1857, by Edmund Ellsworth; set apart as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 14, 1882, at age 45; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 8, 1883; died Dec. 15, 1924, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Seymour Bicknell Young

25. Christian Daniel Fjeldsted—Born Feb. 20, 1829, at Amagar, Sundbyvester Co., Copenhagen, Denmark, to Hendrik Ludvig Fjeldsted and Ann Catrine Hendriksen. Ordained a seventy Feb. 5, 1859, by William H. Walker; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 6, 1884, at age 55; died Dec. 23, 1905, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Christian Daniel Fjeldsted

26. John Morgan—Born Aug. 8, 1842, at Greensburg, Ind., to Gerrard Morgan and Ann Eliza Hamilton. Ordained a seventy Oct. 8, 1875, by Joseph Young; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 5, 1884, at age 42; died Aug. 14, 1894, at Preston, Idaho.

John Morgans

27. Brigham Henry Roberts—Born Mar. 13, 1857, at Warrington, Lancashire Co., England, to Benjamin Roberts and Ann Everington. Ordained a seventy Mar. 8, 1877, by Nathan T. Porter. Sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 7, 1888, at age 31; died Sept. 27, 1933, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Brigham Henry Roberts

28. George Reynolds—Born Jan. 1, 1842, at Marylebone, London Co., London, England, to George Reynolds and Julie Ann Tautz. Ordained a seventy Mar. 18, 1866, by Israel Barlow; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 5, 1890, at age 48; died Aug. 9, 1909, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

George Reynoldsl

29. Jonathan Golden Kimball—Born June 9, 1853, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to Heber Chase Kimball and Christeen Golden. Ordained a seventy July 21, 1886, by William M. Allred; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 5, 1892, at age 38; killed in an automobile accident Sept. 2, 1938, near Reno, Nevada.

Jonathan Golden Kimball

30. Rulon Seymour Wells—Born July 7, 1854, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to Daniel Hanmer Wells and Louisa Free. Ordained a seventy Oct. 22, 1875, by Brigham Young; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 5, 1893, at age 38; died May 7, 1941, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Rulon Seymour Wells

31. Edward Stevenson—Born May 1, 1820, at Gibraltar, Spain, to Joseph Stevenson and Elizabeth Stevens. Ordained a seventy May 1, 1844, by Joseph Young; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 7, 1894, at age 74; died Jan. 27, 1897, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Edward Stevenson

32. Joseph William McMurrin—Born Sept. 5, 1858, at Tooele, Utah, to Joseph McMurrin and Margaret Leaing. Ordained a seventy Apr. 21, 1884, by Royal Barney; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 5, 1897, and set apart Jan. 21, 1898, at Liverpool, England, at age 39; died Oct. 24, 1932, at Los Angeles, Calif.

Joseph William McMurrin

33. Charles Henry Hart—Born July 5, 1866, at Bloomington, Idaho, to James Henry Hart and Sabina Scheib. Ordained a seventy Aug. 10, 1890, by John Henry Smith; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Apr. 9, 1906, at age 39; died Sept. 29, 1934, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Charles Henry Hart

34. Levi Edgar Young—Born Feb. 2, 1874, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to Seymour Bicknell Young and Ann Elizabeth Riter. Ordained a seventy June 18, 1897, by Seymour B. Young; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Oct. 6, 1909, and set apart Jan. 23, 1910, at age 36; died Dec. 13, 1963, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Levi Edgar Youngt

35. Rey Lucero Pratt—Born Oct. 11, 1878, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to Helaman Pratt and Emeline Victoria Billingsley. Ordained a seventy Sept. 23, 1911, by Rulon S. Wells; sustained as one of the first seven presidents Jan. 29, 1925, and set apart Apr. 7, 1925, at age 46; died Apr. 14, 1931, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Rey Lucero Pratt

36. Antoine Ridgeway Ivins—Born May 11, 1881, at Saint George, Utah, to Anthony Woodward Ivins and Elizabeth A. Snow. Ordained a seventy Dec. 28, 1913, by Fred E. Barker; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy, Oct. 4, 1931, at age 50; ordained a high priest June 11, 1961, by David O. McKay; died Oct. 18, 1967, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Antoine Ridgeway Ivins

37. Samuel Otis Bennion—Born June 9, 1874, at Taylorsville, Utah, to John Rowland Bennion and Emma Jane Terry. Ordained a seventy Mar. 14, 1904, by Samuel Gerrard; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1933, at age 58; died May 28, 1946, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Samuel Otis Bennion

38. John Harris Taylor—Born June 28, 1875, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to Thomas E. Taylor and Emma L. Harris. Ordained a seventy Jan. 24, 1896, by Heber J. Grant; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 6, 1933, at age 58; died May 28, 1946, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

John Harris Taylor

39. Rufus Kay Hardy—Born May 28, 1878, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to Rufus H. Hardy and Annie Kay. Ordained a seventy July 2, 1897, by John Henry Smith; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 6, 1934, and set apart Feb. 7, 1935, at age 56; died Mar. 7, 1945, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Rufus Kay Hardy

40. Richard Louis Evans—Born Mar. 23, 1906, at Salt Lake City, Utah, to John A. Evans and Florence Neslen. Ordained a seventy Aug. 5, 1938, by Rulon S. Wells; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 7, 1938, at age 32; ordained an apostle Oct. 8, 1953.

Richard Louis Evans

41. Oscar Ammon Kirkham—Born Jan. 22, 1880, at Lehi, Utah, to James Kirkham and Martha Mercer. Ordained a seventy Feb. 26, 1906, by Joseph W. McMurrin; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 5, 1941, at age 61; died Mar. 10, 1958, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Oscar Ammon Kirkham

42. Seymour Dilworth Young—Born Sept. 7, 1897, at Salt Lake City, Utah, the son of Seymour Bicknell Young, Jr., and Carlie Louine Clawson. Ordained a seventy Jan. 9, 1920, by Seymour B. Young; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1945, at age 47; ordained a high priest June 11, 1961, by Henry D. Moyle.

Seymour Dilworth Young

43. Milton Reed Hunter—Born Oct. 25, 1902, at Holden, Utah, to John E. Hunter and Margaret Teeples. Ordained a seventy Aug. 31, 1928, by Rulon S. Wells; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1945, at age 42; ordained a high priest June 11, 1961, by David O. McKay; died Jun. 27, 1975, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Milton Reed Hunter

44. Bruce Redd McConkie—Born Jul. 29, 1915, at Ann Arbor, Mich., to Oscar Waller McConkie and Margaret Vivian Redd. Ordained a seventy Feb. 28, 1937, by Rufus K. Hardy; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 6, 1946, at age 31; ordained a high priest Jun. 11, 1961, by Henry D. Moyle; ordained an apostle Oct. 12, 1972, by Harold B. Lee.

Bruce Redd McConkie

45. Marion Duff Hanks—Born Oct. 13, 1921, at Salt Lake City, Utah to Stanley Alonzo Hanks and Maude Frame. Ordained a seventy May 5, 1944, by Antoine R. Ivins; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 4, 1953, at age 32; ordained a high priest Jul. 27, 1961, by David O. McKay; sustained as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apr. 6, 1968.

Marion Duff Hanks

46. Albert Theodore Tuttle—Born Mar. 2, 1919, at Manti, Utah, to Albert M. Tuttle and Clarice Beal. Ordained a seventy Sept. 25, 1939, by Rulon S. Wells; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1958, at age 39; ordained a high priest Jul. 27, 1961, by Henry D. Moyle.

Albert Theodore Tuttle

47. Paul Harold Dunn—Born Apr. 24, 1924, at Provo, Utah, to Joshua Harold Dunn and Geneve Roberts. Ordained a seventy Oct. 15, 1950, by Levi Edgar Young; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1964, at age 40; ordained a high priest Apr. 9, 1964, by David O. McKay.

Paul Harold Dunn

48. Hartman Rector, Jr.—Born Aug. 20, 1924, at Moberly, Mo., to Hartman Rector and Vivian Fay Garvin. Ordained a seventy May 19, 1956, by George Q. Morris; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1968, at age 43; ordained a high priest Apr. 8, 1968, by Nathan Eldon Tanner.

Hartman Rector, Jr.

49. Loren Charles Dunn—Born Jun. 12, 1930, at Tooele, Utah, to Alex F. Dunn and Carol Horsfall. Ordained a seventy Aug. 23, 1965, by John Longden; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Apr. 6, 1968, at age 37; ordained a high priest Apr. 8, 1968, by S. Dilworth Young.

Loren Charles Dunn

50. Rex Dee Pinegar—Born Sept. 18, 1931, at Orem, Utah, to John F. Pinegar and Grace Murl Ellis. Ordained a seventy Apr. 28, 1957, by Marion D. Hanks; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 6, 1972, at age 41; ordained a high priest Nov. 8, 1974, by Spencer W. Kimball.

Rex Dee Pinegar

51. Gene Raymond Cook—Born Sept. 1, 1941, at Lehi, Utah, to Clarence H. Cook and Myrl Thornton. Ordained a seventy Aug. 10, 1967, by James A. Cullimore; sustained as one of the First Council of the Seventy Oct. 3, 1975, at age 34.

Gene Raymond Cook