Margaret D. Nadauld Young Women General President


Margaret D. Nadauld

“I have always loved young women for their sensitive spiritual nature, gentleness, and special beauty,” says Margaret Dyreng Nadauld, who has served on the Relief Society general board and in five Young Women ward presidencies, including three times as president. “I look forward to being more involved in the lives of our young women Churchwide, and I hope I can find ways to be a blessing to them and to serve them.”

Born in Manti, Utah, on 21 November 1944, Margaret was the oldest of four children born to R. Morgan and Helen Bailey Dyreng. “I watched my parents in their leadership callings in the Church and the community,” she says of her father and mother, who helped start the Mormon Miracle Pageant in Manti 30 years ago. “We just grew up knowing that we should serve and do whatever we could do to make things grow.”

Opportunities to develop leadership skills came early to Sister Nadauld and have continued throughout her life. In addition to serving in Young Women, she has served as a Relief Society president and counselor and as a counselor in stake and ward Primary presidencies. “I’ve tried to be active in civic organizations as well as the Church,” says Sister Nadauld, who has served as president of the Utah chapter of the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge and also as vice president of the Utah chapter of American Mothers, Inc.

She attended Snow College for one year, graduated in speech and English from Brigham Young University in 1967, and then taught high school English in Salt Lake City and in Boston. On 11 July 1968 in the Manti Temple, Margaret married Stephen D. Nadauld, who later served in the Second Quorum of the Seventy from 1991 to 1996. The parents of seven sons, the Nadaulds have lived in Boston, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay Area as well as in Utah. Though she likes playing the piano and is an avid reader, Sister Nadauld says she enjoys most the things their family does together—such as sports and outdoor activities.

“I know I need to be dependent on the Lord,” she says. “I will try to do what he wants for the Young Women and to be a receptive servant while I’m on his errand.”