Random Sampler


Teaching Children to Work

Helping children develop good work habits while they are young is essential to their progression and happiness. The following are suggestions that may help this learning process.

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    Teach children the principles of work at a young age. By age three children can do simple household chores such as making their beds and picking up their toys. Often a notoriously mundane task, such as matching socks, can be a time of enjoyment for parents and young children. We call it a “laundry party,” and our little ones come and help fold and put away the clothes. Even our teens still help and join in the fun.

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    Teach children to understand the value of money and how it results from work. We paid our children a nominal allowance at an early age to help introduce the work-money relationship. By age eight they were shoveling neighbors’ walks or caring for pets of vacationing owners. As our children grew, they were ready for additional responsibilities inside and outside the home. As teens they now baby-sit and do yard work and other jobs. These skills, their forthcoming self-confidence, and a little financial incentive combined to make it easier for our children to learn more advanced jobs as they matured.

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    Teach children to pay tithing. The blessings of paying tithing can be recognized at an early age and can help develop faith.

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    Teach children to budget an income. Our philosophy has been to pay for our children’s basic needs and necessities. One thing that has worked well for us is allowing them to pay the difference when they have wanted a more costly name-brand item. They understand we have a limited budget, and they can earn and spend their money as they want, once tithing and savings are paid.

We have learned that making an effort to inspire good work habits in our children’s lives, while incorporating gospel principles, richly blesses the lives of our children and ourselves.Alison Affeltranger, Sego Lily Ward, Sandy Utah Granite South Stake

[illustration] Illustrated by Joe Flores

Helping Those with Hearing Loss

For those who have no problems hearing, being aware of the challenges of being hearing-impaired can help us to be more sensitive to others’ needs. Following are ways to improve communication.

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    When speaking, face the person directly. Avoid covering your mouth with your hands. Besides improving conduction of sound waves, this allows those who can lip-read to understand better.

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    Pronounce your words distinctly. Clear enunciation greatly improves understanding.

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    Speak louder. Talking louder than normal may help facilitate hearing, but do not shout. Excessive volume can blur sounds.

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    Remember that most hearing aids magnify ALL sounds. This means that not only is your voice amplified, but also the background noise. This cacophony of sound makes it difficult for a person losing their hearing to pick out the voice of the person who is speaking to them. In these situations, asking a person to “turn up his hearing aid” is not a viable solution. Move closer, speak louder, or wait until the background noise has subsided.

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    Get their attention before speaking. Many hearing-impaired individuals have learned to ignore noise in order to concentrate on what is around them. They may not realize you want to speak to them unless you first get their attention. If you are approaching them from behind, get their attention by touching them on the arm. If approaching from the front, you may need to give a gentle hand movement to get their attention.

  6. 6.

    Realize that hearing aids do not restore all hearing. “The hard-of-hearing appreciate it when people know that hearing aids are not devices that give normal hearing,” says audiologist Evelyn Cherow, past director of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. You may want to consider learning some sign language to help you communicate.

Those who hear well can be sensitive to others’ needs and reach across the natural barriers that exist between the hearing and the hard-of-hearing world.Marlene B. Sullivan, Orchard Fifth Ward, Bountiful Utah Orchard Stake

Book of Mormon Theater

To introduce our family’s study of the Book of Mormon, we planned a Book of Mormon theater for family home evening. The following is a step-by-step approach for putting on your own little play.

First, place props in a laundry basket to be used in the theater. Robes and cloth for headbands can be used for the costumes. Then, in a small bag put slips of paper with either titles of Book of Mormon stories or Primary songs about the Book of Mormon. Next, each family member takes a turn picking a slip of paper from the small bag. If the slip has the title of a song, the person who picked it leads the family in singing that song. If a Book of Mormon story is picked, the person chooses who will play the characters in that specific story. Then someone reads the story (we use a children’s version of the Book of Mormon stories) while the “cast” acts it out, using the clothes and props in the laundry basket.

Here are examples of songs you could use from the Children’s Songbook:

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    “Book of Mormon Stories,” p. 118.

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    “Nephi’s Courage,” p. 120.

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    “Had I Been a Child,” p. 80.

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    “Samuel Tells of the Baby Jesus,” p. 36.

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    “The Books in the Book of Mormon,” p. 119.

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    “The Golden Plates,” p. 86.

Use your imagination to find stories in the Book of Mormon that your family could act out. Some examples we found are:

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    “Nephi Building the Ship”

    Cast members: Nephi, Laman, and Lemuel.

    Building blocks could be used for making the ship, or a blanket or large towel could be a pretend ship the family could sail on.

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    “King Benjamin’s Discourse”

    Cast members: King Benjamin, people listening to the discourse.

    The person playing King Benjamin could stand on a chair while family members sit on blankets and listen, or blankets could be used as tents.

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    “The Conversion of Alma the Younger”

    Cast members: Alma the Younger, sons of Mosiah, and the angel.

    One person could represent the sons of Mosiah if there are not enough people.

    Acting ability is not necessary to help your family benefit from Book of Mormon theater. By acting out the scenes, you help the Book of Mormon come alive for your family and encourage the study of it at an early age.Brenda Minor, Suncrest Fifth Ward, Orem Utah Suncrest Stake

[illustration] Illustrated by Beth M. Whittaker