President Boyd K. Packer: Apostle and Artist


Ever since his childhood in the farming community of Brigham City, Utah, President Boyd K. Packer has had a love of nature and art. Of particular interest to him have been birds and animals. In high school, he had ambitions to become an artist, but World War II led him in another direction. After serving as a pilot in the Pacific, he returned home and turned his attention to college, marriage, and teaching seminary.

Today he serves as Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He and his wife, Donna Smith Packer, are the parents of 10 children, and take delight in their grandchildren. But throughout his life, President Packer has pursued his love of art through his carvings of birds and paintings of rural Utah.

Following are some of the images of his artwork currently featured in an exhibit at the Museum of Church History and Art entitled “Boyd K. Packer: The Lifework of an Amateur Artist.” The exhibit will be open through 6 September 2004 and can be viewed on the Internet at www.lds.org/museum/exhibits/packer.

Savior in Gethsemane(click to view larger)

Savior in Gethsemane (after a Heinrich Hofmann painting).

Lazuli Buntings, Iris Flower(click to view larger)

Lazuli Buntings, Iris Flower, created from carved wood, with leaves of annealed copper.

Bishop’s Team(click to view larger)

In the painting Bishop’s Team, President Packer pays tribute to the dedication of bishops in the Church.

Noah’s Ark(click to view larger)

Noah’s Ark is a favorite toy of the Packer grandchildren. If an animal breaks, President Packer glues it back together.

Blue Jay, Norway Maple Leaves(click to view larger)

Blue Jay, Norway Maple Leaves, created from carved wood and annealed copper.

Peacocks and Autumn Leaves(click to view larger)

Peacocks and Autumn Leaves is a reminder of President Packer’s love of the peacocks he once kept.

Sego lilies and covered wagons(click to view larger)

The Packer family worked together for two years to carve this mantel with sego lilies and covered wagons, exhibited as a full-size replica.

[photo] President Packer relaxing with his carving.