Visiting Teaching Message

Participate in Sincere Prayer


Prayerfully teach these scriptures and quotations or, if needed, another principle that will bless the sisters you visit. Bear testimony of the doctrine. Invite those you visit to share what they have felt and learned.

Participate in Sincere Prayer

Sincere Prayer Has Strengthening Power

Julie B. Beck, Relief Society general president: “Think of our combined strength if every sister had sincere prayer every morning and night or, better yet, prayed unceasingly as the Lord has commanded. If every family had family prayer daily … , we would be stronger” (“What Latter-day Saint Women Do Best: Stand Strong and Immovable,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2007, 110).

Elder Bruce R. McConkie (1915–85) of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles: “Prayer changes our lives. Through it we draw near to the Lord, and he reaches out his finger and touches us, so we never again are the same.

“Prayer is a great tower of strength, a pillar of unending righteousness, a mighty force that moves mountains and saves souls” (“Patterns of Prayer,” Ensign, May 1984, 32).

Elder M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles: “Every honest and sincere prayer adds another piece to chain-mail armor. … One of the most important ways to clothe yourselves in the armor of God is to make sure that prayer—earnest, sincere, consistent prayer—is part of your daily lives” (“Be Strong in the Lord,” Ensign, July 2004, 10).

D&C 112:10: “Be thou humble; and the Lord thy God shall lead thee by the hand, and give thee answer to thy prayers.”

Sincere Prayer Is Holy Communication

President James E. Faust (1920–2007), Second Counselor in the First Presidency: “First, prayer is a humble acknowledgment that God is our Father and that the Lord Jesus Christ is our Savior and Redeemer. Second, it is a sincere confession of sin and transgression and a request for forgiveness. Third, it is recognition that we need help beyond our own ability. Fourth, it is an opportunity to express thanksgiving and gratitude to our Creator. It is important that we frequently say: ‘We thank Thee … ,’ ‘We acknowledge before Thee … ,’ ‘We are grateful unto Thee …’ Fifth, it is a privilege to ask Deity for specific blessings.

“… Sincere prayers come from the heart. Indeed, sincerity requires that we draw from the earnest feelings of our hearts” (“The Lifeline of Prayer,” Liahona, July 2002, 62; Ensign, May 2002, 59–60).

Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles: “Meaningful prayer requires both holy communication and consecrated work. Blessings require some effort on our part before we can obtain them, and prayer, as ‘a form of work, … is an appointed means for obtaining the highest of all blessings’ (Bible Dictionary, ‘Prayer,’ 753). We press forward and persevere in the consecrated work of prayer, after we say ‘amen,’ by acting upon the things we have expressed to Heavenly Father” (“Ask in Faith,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2008, 95).

President Thomas S. Monson: “As we offer unto the Lord our family and our personal prayers, let us do so with faith and trust in Him. Let us remember the injunction of the Apostle Paul to the Hebrews: ‘For he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.’ If any of us has been slow to hearken to the counsel to pray always, there is no finer hour to begin than now” (“A Royal Priesthood,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2007, 61).

Photo illustration by Craig Dimond