What are Latter-day Saints doing to better the communities in which they live? Find out by going to MormonNewsroom.org. Here are some examples from recent postings on the international Newsroom websites.

New Zealand and Vanuatu

When Cyclone Pam struck the small Pacific island nation of Vanuatu, Latter-day Saints in Auckland, New Zealand—with aid from Church Humanitarian Services—rallied to help those devastated by the storm. They packed 2,000 boxes of food to help as many of the affected population as possible. Each container was filled with flour, rice, canned fruit, beans, corned beef, fish, crackers, raisins, noodles, chocolate milk powder, and a can opener. The containers can also be used for other purposes, such as carrying water.

Dominican Republic and Canada

In the Dominican Republic and Canada, Latter-day Saint women joined in commemorating International Women’s Day, an event sponsored by the United Nations. More than 1,200 women gathered in Church meetinghouses in several areas of the Dominican Republic to honor women for their many contributions in the world. Religious, civic, and military leaders participated in the event, which included a program of music and speeches. In Canada, Latter-day Saint women also marked the day by sharing information about the Relief Society, noting that it is a “tremendous vehicle for service around the globe.”

United Kingdom

Their original goal was to sew 100 dresses for needy children in Africa, but when they were finished, the women of the Coventry Ward in England had made more than 230. The simple dresses, made from pillowcases, are easy to complete. One sister, who had not previously sewn, was able to make 3 of them.

Arkansas, USA

More than 600 people attended an interfaith community devotional on the topic of religious freedom hosted by the Little Rock Arkansas Stake, including representatives from the Catholic, Methodist, and Islamic communities and an Evangelical radio personality. The multi-faith event also included a videotaped message from the state lieutenant governor and a closing prayer from a state senator, both Baptists. Organizers said the event built “bridges of understanding.”