If I Had a Ship written and illustrated by Ben Shecter. New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1970.

“If I had a ship, I’d be captain and sail all over the world. And I’d bring you home presents.” And so the young sailor with his duck set sail to search the world for gifts to give his mother. This is a delightful story with beautiful pictures.

Motherly Smith & Brother Bimbo by Solveig Paulson Russell; drawings by Susan Perl. New York: Abingdon Press, 1971.

Motherly Smith, an alley cat, catches a skinny mouse named Brother Bimbo. The cat decides that he must fatten up the sad-looking mouse before he can make a meal of him. And so he begins to teach Brother Bimbo to be a decent fat creature. But when the Bruiser Brothers decide that they will eat the mouse right now, trouble begins!

Readers of the Friend will recognize the name of Mrs. Russell. Many of her stories and poems have appeared on our pages.

Annie and the Old One by Miska Miles; illustrated by Peter Parnall. Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1971.

The beautiful, perceptive illustrations enhance the sensitive story of Annie and her Navajo world. The Old One, Annie’s grandmother, has said that when the rug on the loom is finished, she will go to Mother Earth. Annie plots to keep the rug from being finished, only to find that she cannot hold back time.

The Three Little Pigs by Paul Galdone. New York: The Seabury Press, 1970.

The familiar tale of the three little pigs and the wolf who huffed and puffed is delightfully retold and illustrated.

The Seabury Cookbook for Boys and Girls by Eva Moore; pictures by Talivaldis Stubis. New York: The Seabury Press, 1969.

Here is an easy-to-make picture cookbook with fun-to-follow recipes. The cheerful pictures show the cook exactly how to prepare them. There is also a section on how to give a party and how to prepare supper by yourself.