Friends in Books


Since reading, like any other pastime, can be expensive if a reader purchased every new book published, many outstanding books for young people have recently been published in paperback editions. Such editions are much less expensive than hardbound books but still provide the same quality of illustrations and print. Following are some of the titles that appear in paperback, many of which have received recognition for excellence.

One Morning in Maine by Robert McCloskey. The Viking Press, 1952. The loss of Sal’s first tooth reminds her that she is growing up.

Contrary Jenkins by Rebecca Caudill and James Ayars; illustrated by Glen Rounds. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1969. The adventures of a man who does the opposite of whatever others suggest.

Noisy Nancy Norris by Lou Ann Gaeddert. Doubleday and Company, Inc., 1965. Noisy Nancy becomes so quiet that complaining Mrs. Muffle downstairs asks to hear her playful noises again.

Do Baby Bears Sit in Chairs? by Ethel and Leonard Kessler. Doubleday and Company, 1961. Children and animals have a lot in common, but only children get a goodnight hug and kiss.

All in the Morning Early by Sorche Nic Leodhas; illustrated by Evaline Ness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1963. On his way to the mill with a sack of corn, Sandy meets many friends who accompany him on his journey.

Evan’s Corner by Elizabeth Starr Hill; illustrated by Nancy Grossman. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1967. Evan learns that helping others is more important than a place to call his own.

The Bee-Man of Orn by Frank R. Stockton; pictures by Maurice Sendak. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964. Even a new start in life does not change an old man’s desire to keep company with bees.

Secret Places by D. J. Arneson; photographed by Peter Arnold. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1971. A boy has a secret place in the woods that he hopes to keep.

Crow Boy by Taro Yashima. The Viking Press, 1955. Tiny Boy is a loner in the village school until he earns the name Crow Boy.

A Pocketful of Cricket by Rebecca Caudill, illustrated by Evaline Ness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964. Jay takes advantage of a “Show and Tell” activity in school to share his private world.

Some of the Days of Everett Anderson by Lucille Clifton; illustrated by Evaline Ness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970. Everett Anderson lives in apartment 14A and enjoys the experiences of a six-year-old.

Sam, Bangs and Moonshine by Evaline Ness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1966. Sam sends Thomas on a wild goose chase that almost ends in tragedy. Sam finally learns to distinguish between reality and moonshine.

Coll and His White Pig by Lloyd Alexander; illustrated by Evaline Ness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1965. Hen Wen disappears in the middle of the night, and Coll sets out to recover the white pig.

We Wonder What Will Walter Be When He Grows Up? by Crockett Johnson. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964. Walter seeks advice about his future but decides he is the only one to make the decision.

Is Somewhere Always Far Away? by Leland B. Jacobs; pictures by John E. Johnson. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1967. Poems about wishes and places and experiences.

John John Twilliger by William Wondriska. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1966. John John befriends the Machine-Gun Man, and his bravery results in a change for the entire village of Merryall.

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey. The Viking Press, 1969. A family of ducks finds a place to live in the Public Gardens.

The Truthful Harp by Lloyd Alexander; illustrated by Evaline Ness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1967. Fflewddur Fflam learns that truth is purest gold and needs no gilding.

The Friendly Bear by Robert Bright. Doubleday and Company, 1957. Matt discovers the difference between the Friendly Bear and his wise Grampa.

The Little Island by Golden MacDonald and Leonard Weisgard. Doubleday and Company, 1946. Even a little island in the ocean is part of the world, for under the sea all is one land.