For Little Friends

By Pat Kelsey Graham


“Follow the Prophet” Face Frame

Heeding the prophets: … In this there is … peace (Children’s Songbook, page 147).

Following the prophets helps us to be happy. Hold the Face Frame to your face as you sing each verse in “Follow the Prophet” (Children’s Songbook, pages 110–111). Or you can use the Face Frame and “be” each of the prophets telling his story “in his own words.”

Instructions

  1. 1.

    Ask an older person to mount pages 30–31 on sturdy cardboard, then cut out the Face Frame, each name tag, and the slit on each side of the name tag already on the Face Frame.

  2. 2.

    Fold the tabs on each name tag, and tuck it in place as you sing the corresponding verse of “Follow the Prophet” or tell each prophet’s story.

Note: If you want to “be” President Hinckley on television, cut out the middle of a ledger-size piece of white paper or cardboard, draw knobs or push buttons on bottom, and color the “television” Face Frame (see illustration).

[illustrations] Illustrated by Dick Brown

Shadow, Grandpa, and Me

I have a very funny kitten. She followed my grandpa home one day, and she has stayed with us since then. We call her Shadow because she is black.

Shadow always looks up. She jumps into the empty bathtub, looks up at the towels, then jumps up to pull one down. When she is outside and wants to come in, she looks up at the window in the door and jumps up and holds on to the window frame with her paws and looks in at us.

Sometimes I think Shadow believes she is a dog. She jumps out of a hiding place and lands on my dog; then they roll around on the ground and playfully chew on each other. When my dog grabs a stick, Shadow runs around, trying to catch it. They even eat out of the same bowl.

Shadow really loves to look up at my grandpa. He picks her up and pets her and tells her what a good kitty she is. I think she loves him in a special way because he found her. She was very tiny and sick when she followed him home. He took her to the animal doctor to get her some medicine. Grandpa made her a nice, warm bed in our house too.

I am like Shadow. I like to look up high, too—way up to the sky. I can see birds in the trees and clouds in the air. I like to run with my dog and throw him sticks—but I don’t eat out of his bowl! And like he does with Shadow, my grandpa picks me up and tells me what a good boy I am. I love him in a special way, too, because he’s my grandpa!

[illustrations] Illustrated by Doug Roy

Butterfly Salad

1 large lettuce leaf

1/2 small banana (cut lengthwise)

1 slice pineapple, cut in half

2 maraschino cherries, sliced in half

2 toothpicks

  1. 1.

    Place the lettuce on a salad plate and lay the banana half (the butterfly’s “body”), flat side down, across it.

  2. 2.

    Place each half of the pineapple slice (the butterfly’s wings) on either side of the banana.

  3. 3.

    Stick one end of each toothpick into the top of the banana, then stick a cherry half onto the other end (the butterfly’s antennae).

  4. 4.

    Place one cherry half in the middle of each wing as a design.

Good Books for Little Friends

Fiddle-I-Fee: A Noisy Nursery Rhyme by Jakki Wood The animals’ sounds are mostly unconventional but so merry that whether you sing the story (the tune is included) or read it, it will soon be a favorite.

When I Was Your Age by Ken Adams No matter what Sammy says or does, Grandpa had it harder or did it better when he was Sammy’s age. For instance: “‘When I was your age, … I had to get up in the middle of the night, walk fifty miles to school, through a crocodile-infested swamp, and over the highest mountain in the country, carrying my school books and my little sister on my back.’” The art is as funny as Grandpa’s claims are outrageous—until the last one.

Come by Chance by Madeleine Winch This lovely tale about a person who has respect and love for living things comes from Australia.

Grandma’s Baseball by Gavin Curtis After Grandpa died, Grandma came to live with them. She was always grumpy, and she made oatmeal for breakfast every morning. The boy didn’t like oatmeal, and he never seemed to please her. Then he found her baseball.