From the Life of President Harold B. Lee


Principal

See The Lord Needed a Prophet, by Susan Arrington Madsen, pages 174–76; He Changed My Life, by L. Brent Goates, page 131.

When Harold B. Lee was seventeen, he became a teacher. He taught in a one-room school near Weston, Idaho. Some of his students were older than he was!

The pot-bellied stove in the middle of the room sometimes fell apart, filling the school with smoke and soot.

Harold: Quick, help me put the stovepipe back on!

Student: Yes, sir!

A year later, he became both the principal and a teacher at nearby Oxford School. The students there liked to play tricks on him. While he was busy talking to someone, they hid his horse.

So he had to walk several miles to get home.

Harold: I must keep better control of my class. I want them to be my friends.

One day, he decided to join his students during their lunch break.

Harold: Mind if I play with you? Whose team can I be on?

Students: You can be on ours.

Student: Wow! Great shot!

His plan to befriend his students worked. Joseph Gibby, one of his students, later said, “He made a place in my heart through his love and understanding that caused me to regard him, next to my own dear father, as the best friend I had on this earth.”