Kitchen Krafts


Every spring, Cameron and Mia Harper like to hunt for wild asparagus that grows by the railroad tracks near their home. It is one of their favorite foods. Cameron and Mia eat it broiled or steamed, but they like it steamed the best. With a parent’s help, cook your own asparagus and see which way you like it. To read more about Cameron and Mia, turn to page 18.

Broiled Asparagus

20 asparagus spears

1/4 cup olive oil, or melted butter or margarine

salt

  1. 1.

    Each piece of asparagus looks like a little spear. The pointy end is tender, but the straight end is tough. To remove the tough end, hold one end of the asparagus with each hand, then bend the asparagus into the shape of a U. The asparagus will break in two near the tough end. Throw away all the tough ends.

  2. 2.

    Rinse the asparagus in cold water and let dry.

  3. 3.

    Place the olive oil in a bowl. Roll the asparagus spears in the oil until they are covered.

  4. 4.

    Place the asparagus on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Sprinkle with salt. Broil in the oven for about 3–5 minutes, or until brown and bubbly.

Steamed Asparagus

20 asparagus spears

1 cup water

butter

salt

1 lemon, if desired

  1. 1.

    Wash and prepare asparagus as described in the other recipe.

  2. 2.

    Place a vegetable steamer in the bottom of a wide pot. Add water.

  3. 3.

    Arrange the asparagus spears to evenly cover the steamer. Put the lid on the pot and bring the water to a boil.

  4. 4.

    Cook the asparagus for about 5–6 minutes, or until you can easily pierce it with a fork. Serve with butter and salt. Cut the lemon in half, and squeeze a little lemon juice on top if you would like.

Did You Know?

People in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome liked to eat asparagus. In fact, a recipe book from the third century included a recipe for asparagus.

Illustration by Brad Teare