Picture Books

Sergio Makes a Splash! by Edel Rodriguez. Sergio the penguin loves water but is afraid to swim. When his class takes a field trip to the ocean, will he face his fear so he can enjoy the water that he loves?

Best Little Wingman, by Janet Allen, illustrated by Jim Postier. On a snowy night, Janny has a special job to do to help her father. They go out together in his snowplow, and a daddy and a daughter do a good night’s work.

All Things Bright and Beautiful, by Cecil Frances Alexander, illustrated by Bruce Whatley. With the words of a traditional hymn, a young girl on a farm appreciates the wonder and beauty of Heavenly Father’s creations.

The Littlest Owl, by Caroline Pitcher, illustrated by Tina Macnaughton. Baby Owl Four doesn’t mind being small, but he has some trouble learning to fly. What will happen when a storm threatens his family’s nest in the willow tree?

For children ages 5–9

How Oliver Olson Changed the World, by Claudia Mills, pictures by Heather Maione. Sometimes Oliver thinks his parents help him too much. When he and his classmate, Crystal, get some big ideas about their solar-system project, can Oliver convince his parents—and himself—that he can accomplish great things on his own?

On the Go with Pirate Pete and Pirate Joe, by A. E. Cannon, illustrated by Elwood H. Smith. Pete and Joe are always ready for swashbuckling action. Join them on their pirate adventures as they look for a ship, have a seafood dinner, and find the perfect pet.

Agapanthus Hum and the Eyeglasses, by Joy Cowley, pictures by Jennifer Plecas. Agapanthus likes to dance and run and do handstands. But whenever she does, her glasses fall off or get bent. Find out how Agapanthus solves her problem in an unusual way.

For children ages 10–12

The Sign of the Beaver*, by Elizabeth George Speare. When Matt’s father leaves the forest to bring the rest of his family to live in their new settlement, Matt is left alone in their cabin. But a Native American man and his grandson, Attean, are watching. In time, Matt gives Attean reading lessons in return for lessons on surviving in the wilderness.

Willow Run*, by Patricia Reilly Giff. When Meggie’s family moves so her father can work at a factory during World War II, Meggie has to leave behind her grandfather and the beautiful ocean. Meggie wonders if the barren land and cramped apartment are worth helping the war effort she hears so much about. Read about Meggie’s wish to have her brother return safely from the war and have her family together again.

Nonfiction

A Weed is a Flower: The Life of George Washington Carver, by Aliki. There wasn’t much hope for George Washington Carver when he was born. He was sickly, orphaned, and the son of slaves. But read his story to find out how he devoted his life to helping the world around him.

Rare Treasure: Mary Anning and Her Remarkable Discoveries, by Don Brown. Mary Anning didn’t have a lot of education, but she knew plenty about dinosaurs! She discovered many fossils during the 19th century and became a scientist and author known around the world.

Prairie Girl: The Life of Laura Ingalls Wilder, by William Anderson, illustrated by Renée Graef. In the 1880s, a young girl living on the American frontier grew up to be a famous writer whose books are loved by children everywhere.

These reviews do not constitute official Church endorsement of these books, but the books have been carefully reviewed to ensure that Church standards are observed. Please note: Occasionally, characters who are not members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints do not follow the Word of Wisdom. Selections where this occurs are marked with an asterisk (*).

Illustration by Mark Robison