Owen’s Second Bedtime Prayer


There’s a right way to live and be happy; it is choosing the right every day (Children’s Songbook, 160).

“Owen, please be good for your babysitter, Marissa, tonight,” Mom said as she put on her coat. “Dad and I won’t be back from our date until after you are asleep, so we will see you in the morning.”

Mom and Dad gave Owen a big hug and left.

Marissa and Owen had fun playing board games and racing Owen’s favorite toy cars. After dinner, Marissa asked, “What game would you like to play before bedtime, Owen?”

“Let’s play hide-and-seek! Ready, set, go!” Owen shouted as he ran to his favorite hiding spot.

“Ready or not, here I come,” Marissa called.

She searched in many different hiding places: under the bed, in the closet, behind the couch. Then the curtains moved, and she saw ten little toes peeking out from under them. “I found you!” she said with a smile as she opened the curtain.

“Let’s play again!” Owen said.

“We can’t play again, Owen. It’s time for bed now. Brush your teeth and put on your pajamas, please.”

“Not yet! I don’t want to go to bed,” Owen said.

“I know, but big boys like you need sleep.”

Owen ran into the living room and picked up one of his cars.

“Come on, Owen,” Marissa said. “It’s time to get ready for bed.”

Owen stomped his foot and started crying. He kept crying as he brushed his teeth and put on his pajamas. After Marissa had read a bedtime story and Owen prayed, he noticed that Marissa looked sad.

“What’s wrong?” Owen asked.

“You didn’t listen to me when I told you it was bedtime,” Marissa said.

Marissa turned out the light and closed the door to Owen’s bedroom. As he lay in bed, he began to feel sad about not listening to Marissa. He said a prayer again, asking Heavenly Father what he should do. He felt the Holy Ghost tell him to say he was sorry.

Owen went to Marissa. “Marissa, I’m sorry for not obeying you and for making you sad.”

“Thank you for saying sorry,” Marissa said. Then she gave him a big hug and tucked him back into bed.

Illustrations by Elise Black