Bulletin Board


Dare to Do Good

Dare means to have the courage to do something. A Primary song says, “Dare to do right! Dare to be true!” (“Dare to Do Right,” Children’s Songbook, 158). When you are tempted to do something you know you shouldn’t, remember to have the courage to stand up for what is right. These children had that courage in tough situations:

One day at school, a boy at my table brought a bad magazine to class. He kept showing it to other boys at my table. It made me feel sad. I asked him if he could please put away the magazine, and he did. It took a lot of courage for me to say something, but I’m glad I did.

Melissa M., age 9, Mexico

One time, two friends of mine were swearing. I told them not to say those words. They quit swearing, and I haven’t heard them say bad words again. I am proud that I had the courage to tell them not to say bad words.

Connor M., age 8, Utah

President Thomas S. Monson

“You will … most likely find yourself in situations where great courage will be required as you stand firm for truth and righteousness. … When firmly planted, your testimony of the gospel, of the Savior, and of our Heavenly Father will influence all that you do throughout your life.”*

–President Thomas S. Monson

Faith in God Challenge

A “Learning and Living the Gospel” activity

General conference is a great time to really tune in to the words of our prophet!

  • Choose a talk given by President Thomas S. Monson in one of the conference sessions this month.

  • Go to conference.lds.org to watch a video of the talk. (The videos are usually online by the Monday after conference.)

  • Before you start watching, get your journal or a blank piece of paper. Make three columns:

    Important Topics

    Things to Do

    Favorite Quote

       
  • As you listen to the talk, take notes to remind yourself of the important things our prophet said and asked you to do.

Journal Junction

This month, write about your school. How do you get to school? Is your school big or small, or do you have school at home? What does your classroom look like? What is your teacher’s name? Write about some of the things you like learning about.

Illustrations by Mark Robison

*“May You Have Courage,” Ensign, May 2009, 126–27.