Aaronic Priesthood and Young Women Resource Guides


The following resources may be used to supplement, but not replace, lessons in Aaronic Priesthood Manual 2 and Young Women Manual 2. Some Duty to God and Personal Progress activities listed in the guides may be worked on during lesson time, or you may encourage quorum or class members to complete them at home.

Please teach the lessons in the order they are printed. The manual does not include a specific Christmas lesson. If you want to teach a special Christmas lesson, consider using scriptures, conference addresses, Church magazine articles, pictures, and hymns that focus on the Savior.

To find non-English versions of the resource guides in some languages, go to www.lds.org, click on “Languages,” and select a language. Click on “Liahona,” then the May 2007 issue. The English version of the resource guides can be found at www.lds.org by clicking on “Gospel Library.” There are links to the resource guides in the right column.

Young Women Manual 2

Lesson 26: The Sacrament

L. Tom Perry, “As Now We Take the Sacrament,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 39. Consider replacing Pam’s story with Elder Perry’s story about vacationing at a resort.

Personal Progress, “Faith Value Experiences,” no. 4.

Lesson 27: Strengthening Testimony through Obedience

Henry B. Eyring, “Spiritual Preparedness: Start Early and Be Steady,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2005, 37. Use Elder Eyring’s four settings as you discuss how obedience can strengthen testimonies.

Lesson 28: Agency

Robert D. Hales, “To Act for Ourselves: The Gift and Blessings of Agency,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 4. Consider replacing President Tanner’s story with Elder Hales’s list of six basic choices.

Wolfgang H. Paul, “The Gift of Agency,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 34. Supplement President Smith’s quote by discussing Elder Paul’s reasons why agency is important.

Lesson 29: Exaltation

James E. Faust, “Where Do I Make My Stand?” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2004, 18. Use President Faust’s counsel to show that making our stand now will help each of us endure to the end.

David A. Bednar, “That We May Always Have His Spirit to Be with Us,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 28. Use “The Ordinance of and Covenant Associated with Baptism” as you teach the importance of receiving ordinances and making covenants.

Lesson 30: Strengthening Testimony through Service

Thomas S. Monson, “How Firm a Foundation,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 62. Tell President Monson’s story of the Young Women class in place of one of the stories in the “True Service Brings Joy” section.

Personal Progress, “Good Works Value Experiences,” nos. 1, 2, 5, and 6.

Lesson 31: The Law of the Land

Russell M. Nelson, “Blessed Are the Peacemakers,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2002, 39. Use the “Civic Obligations” section of this article when discussing love of country.

Lesson 32: The Importance of Life

Russell M. Nelson, “The Creation,” Liahona, July 2000, 102; Ensign, May 2000, 84. Use this talk to explain the wonders of the Creation.

Personal Progress, “Divine Nature Value Experiences,” no. 1.

Lesson 33: The Sacred Power of Procreation

Richard G. Scott, “The Sanctity of Womanhood,” Liahona, July 2000, 43; Ensign, May 2000, 36. Tell the story of Elder Scott’s encounter with the young women in the truck. Contrast their behavior and dress with Church standards.

“The Sacred Powers of Procreation,” Liahona, June 2005, 38; Ensign, June 2005, 26. Use “The Family: A Proclamation to the World” to reinforce the lesson’s principles.

Lesson 34: Hold Fast to the Lord’s Standards

James E. Faust, “Your Light—a Standard to All Nations,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 111. Share the story of Joan of Arc at the end of the lesson, concluding with President Faust’s encouragement to maintain high standards.

Personal Progress, “Integrity Value Experiences,” no. 1.

Lesson 35: Wise Choices

Richard G. Scott, “How to Live Well amid Increasing Evil,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2004, 100. Consider replacing the introduction with the story of the village of Quiriza.

Robert D. Hales, “To Act for Ourselves: The Gift and Blessings of Agency,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 4. Consider incorporating Elder Hales’s concept of leaving a lesson of great importance for our children and grandchildren.

Lesson 36: Honesty

Richard C. Edgley, “Three Towels and a 25-Cent Newspaper,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 72. To conclude the lesson, share Bishop Edgley’s story about the three towels.

Personal Progress, “Integrity Value Experiences,” no. 2.

Lesson 37: Maintaining Chastity through Righteous Living

Jeffrey R. Holland, “To Young Women,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2005, 28. Use to supplement the section on maintaining chastity.

Young Women and Young Men general presidencies, “Real Confidence,” Liahona and New Era, Jan. 2007, 8. Use the suggestions on how to have good thoughts unceasingly to supplement the story about Carolyn.

Personal Progress, “Integrity Value Project,” bullet 5.

Lesson 38: Physical Health

Boyd K. Packer, “Ye Are the Temple of God,” Liahona, Jan. 2001, 85; Ensign, Nov. 2000, 72. Share the story about President Packer’s patriarchal blessing as you discuss the blessings of taking care of our bodies.

Diane L. Spangler, “The Body, a Sacred Gift,” Liahona, July 2005, 16; Ensign, July 2005, 14. Begin the lesson by discussing the differences between God’s view and the world’s view of physical appearances.

Lesson 39: Preventing Disease

Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “See the End from the Beginning,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 42. Share Elder Uchtdorf’s childhood experience when discussing the importance of good health practices.

Lesson 40: Self-Mastery

Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “On the Wings of Eagles,” Liahona, July 2006, 14; Ensign, July 2006, 10. Consider using this article to enhance “The Scriptures and Church Leaders Teach How to Develop Self-Mastery.”

David A. Bednar, “And Nothing Shall Offend Them,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 89. Incorporate the section “Choose Not to Be Offended” in the discussion of “Self-Mastery Leads to Happiness and Self-Esteem.”

Personal Progress, “Integrity Value Experiences,” nos. 2 and 5.

Lesson 41: Optimism

Joseph B. Wirthlin, “The Abundant Life,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 99. You could use stories and examples from this article when discussing how we can learn to be cheerful and optimistic.

Anthony D. Perkins, “The Great and Wonderful Love,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 76. Use this article throughout the lesson to help identify discouragement and ways to overcome it.

Lesson 42: Gratitude and Appreciation

Gordon B. Hinckley, “A Prophet’s Counsel and Prayer for Youth,” Liahona, Apr. 2001, 30; Ensign, Jan. 2001, 2. Read the section on being grateful to support the beginning of the lesson.

Dallin H. Oaks, “Give Thanks in All Things,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2003, 95. Refer to the ideas in this article as you discuss ways to express feelings of gratitude.

Personal Progress, “Individual Worth Value Experiences,” no. 3.

Lesson 43: Wise Use of Leisure Time

Thomas S. Monson, “Pathways to Perfection,” Liahona, July 2002, 111; Ensign, May 2002, 99. Use President Monson’s fourth suggestion to explain the necessity of work and the harm caused by procrastination.

Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Follow Me,” Liahona, July 2002, 15; Ensign, May 2002, 15. Consider using points from this talk with the lesson introduction.

Personal Progress, “Choice and Accountability Value Experiences,” no. 2.

Lesson 44: Developing Talents

James E. Faust, “I Believe I Can, I Knew I Could,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2002, 49. Use this article to supplement the “Lesson Application” section, emphasizing the need to develop and use our gifts for good.

Ronald A. Rasband, “The Parable of the Talents,” Liahona, Aug. 2003, 34; Ensign, Aug. 2003, 32. Use the article to help teach Matthew 25:14–30.

Personal Progress, “Knowledge Value Experiences,” no. 2.

Lesson 45: Participating in the Cultural Arts

Dallin H. Oaks, “Eight Reasons for Revelation,” Liahona, Sept. 2004, 8; “Eight Ways God Can Speak to You,” New Era, Sept. 2004, 4. Use Elder Oaks’s fourth item under “Purposes for Revelation” as part of your discussion on “The Cultural Arts Can Enrich Our Lives.”

Personal Progress, “Individual Worth Value Experiences,” no. 6.

Lesson 46: Financial Responsibility

Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Earthly Debts, Heavenly Debts,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2004, 40. Incorporate Elder Wirthlin’s five steps to financial freedom in your discussion of self-reliance.

Personal Progress, “Choice and Accountability Value Experiences,” no. 7.

Lesson 47: An Uplifting Environment

Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “On the Wings of Eagles,” Liahona, July 2006, 14; Ensign, July 2006, 10. Relate how the Wright brothers affected their environment as part of your discussion on “Creating a Wholesome Environment.”

Jeremy Robertson, “The Sign on the Wall,” Liahona, Aug. 2004, 8; New Era, Aug. 2004, 30. Share this story as part of your introduction.

Lesson 48: Communication Skills in Leadership

L. Tom Perry, “A Solemn Responsibility to Love and Care for Each Other,” Liahona, June 2006, 56; Ensign, June 2006, 88. Use points from the article to supplement the lesson section “We Can All Be Leaders.”

M. Russell Ballard, “O Be Wise,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 17. Discuss the six ways we can serve both wisely and well as part of “Leadership Is Love in Action.”

Lesson 49: Valuing and Encouraging People with Disabilities

Gayle M. Clegg, “Teaching Our Children to Accept Differences,” Liahona, June 2004, 16; Ensign, June 2004, 40. If the video mentioned in the lesson is unavailable, share the two stories at the beginning of this article.

Aaronic Priesthood Manual 2

Lesson 26: Worthy Thoughts

Dallin H. Oaks, Pornography,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2005, 87. Incorporate Elder Oaks’s warnings in the discussion.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Spiritual Development,” no. 5.

Lesson 27: The Lord’s Law of Health

Thomas S. Monson, “True to the Faith,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 18. Consider replacing the story at the end of the lesson with the maka-feke analogy.

Duty to God (Deacon), “Educational, Personal, and Career Development,” no. 12.

Lesson 28: The Sabbath

L. Tom Perry, “The Importance of the Family,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2003, 40. Use Elder Perry’s counsel on appropriate Sabbath day activities in the first section of the lesson.

Earl C. Tingey, “Establishing Eternal Patterns,” Liahona, Oct. 2004, 20; Ensign, Oct. 2004, 32. Replace Elder Cook’s story with Elder Tingey’s advice in the lesson’s “Sabbath Day” section.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Spiritual Development,” no. 2.

Lesson 29: The Purpose of Life

Richard G. Scott, “Truth Restored,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2005, 78. Conclude the lesson with Elder Scott’s counsel on how understanding the plan of salvation will help us overcome life’s challenges.

Robert D. Hales, “To Act for Ourselves: The Gift and Blessings of Agency,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 4. Use ideas from the article to show how agency can help us overcome temptation.

Lesson 30: Charity

H. David Burton, “Tender Hearts and Helping Hands,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 8. Share some of Bishop Burton’s examples in place of the story at the end of the lesson.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Citizenship and Social Development,” no. 3.

Lesson 31: Forgiveness

James E. Faust, “The Atonement: Our Greatest Hope,” Liahona, Jan. 2002, 19; Ensign, Nov. 2001, 18. In the first section of the lesson, discuss how the Atonement empowers us to forgive others.

Boyd K. Packer, “The Brilliant Morning of Forgiveness,” Ensign, Nov. 1995, 18; New Era, Apr. 2005, 4. Consider replacing Corrie ten Boom’s story with John Breen’s story from the article.

Lesson 32: Cultivating Gifts of the Spirit

David A. Bednar, “The Tender Mercies of the Lord,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2005, 99. Explain how spiritual gifts come to us as tender mercies from the Lord.

Lesson 33: Seek Ye Learning

John K. Carmack, “The Perpetual Education Fund: A Bright Ray of Hope,” Liahona, Jan. 2004, 32; Ensign, Jan. 2004, 36. Discuss principles we can learn about getting an education from the Perpetual Education Fund program.

Duty to God (Teacher and Priest), “Educational, Personal, and Career Development,” nos. 1 and 2.

Lesson 34: The Power of Example

Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Need for Greater Kindness,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 58. Tell the story of Richard in place of one of the stories in “A Priesthood Holder’s Good Example Influences Others’ Opinions of the Church.”

Thomas S. Monson, “The Master’s Blueprint,” Liahona and Ensign, Jan. 2006, 2. Incorporate the section titled “Examples of the Believers” into the discussion.

Lesson 35: Obeying, Honoring, and Sustaining the Law

Duty to God (Deacon), “Citizenship and Social Development,” no. 5.

Lesson 36: In Everything Give Thanks

Dallin H. Oaks, “Give Thanks in All Things,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2003, 95. Substitute the introduction with Elder Oaks’s five reasons we give thanks. Have your class give examples from their lives that fit each category.

H. David Burton, “Tender Hearts and Helping Hands,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 8. Consider replacing the story of the auctioneer with the story about Joseph Smith.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Spiritual Development,” no. 10.

Lesson 37: Understanding Women’s Roles

Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Women in Our Lives,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2004, 82. Use the article to discuss how the roles of women are different from men’s but equally as important.

Julie B. Beck, “A ‘Mother Heart,’” Liahona and Ensign, May 2004, 75. Use the article to enhance the lesson’s conclusion.

Lesson 38: Living Righteously in an Unrighteous World

James E. Faust, “The Devil’s Throat,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2003, 51. Use the waterfall analogy from this article to begin the lesson.

Richard G. Scott, “How to Live Well amid Increasing Evil,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2004, 100. Supplement the introduction by sharing Elder Scott’s missionary experience of teaching villagers the gospel.

Duty to God (Deacon, Teacher, and Priest), “Family Activities,” no. 2.

Lesson 39: Moral Courage

Gordon B. Hinckley, “Pursue the Steady Course,” Liahona and Ensign, Jan. 2005, 2. Use the third section of the article to enhance the discussion on developing moral courage to better face challenges.

Duty to God (Priest), “Family Activities,” no. 2.

Lesson 40: Avoiding and Overcoming Temptation

Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “See the End from the Beginning,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 42. Consider replacing the counsel by Elder Rector with Elder Uchtdorf’s counsel on standards.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Spiritual Development,” no. 5.

Lesson 41: The Sacrament: In Remembrance of Him

L. Tom Perry, “As Now We Take the Sacrament,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2006, 39. Use principles from the article as you teach about the covenants made when taking the sacrament.

Duty to God (Deacon), “Quorum Activities,” no. 7; (Priest), “Quorum Activities,” no. 1.

Lesson 42: Follow the Brethren

L. Tom Perry, “We Believe All That God Has Revealed,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2003, 85. As you teach the first section of the lesson, review how revelation comes to the Church.

Jeffrey R. Holland, “Prophets in the Land Again,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 104. Use principles from Elder Holland’s talk to supplement the section “Church Leaders Give Guidance for Our Benefit.”

Lesson 43: Spiritual Preparation for a Mission

David A. Bednar, “Becoming a Missionary,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2005, 44. Use this talk to explain how and why we should spiritually prepare for a mission.

Use the March 2007 Liahona and New Era to supplement the lesson.

Lesson 44: Preparing Now for Temple Marriage

Russell M. Nelson, “Personal Preparation for Temple Blessings,” Liahona, July 2001, 37; Ensign, May 2001, 32. Use this talk to supplement the instruction regarding the temple recommend and the personal preparation required to enter the temple.

M. Russell Ballard, “What Matters Most Is What Lasts Longest,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2005, 41. Use Elder Ballard’s three suggestions to support the lesson’s conclusion.

Lesson 45: Effective Home Teaching

Thomas S. Monson, “Do Your Duty—That Is Best,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2005, 56. Apply President Monson’s counsel about home teaching to the section “Home Teaching Is a Priesthood Responsibility.”

Duty to God (Teacher), “Quorum Activities,” no. 1.

Lesson 46: Avoiding Degrading Media Influences

M. Russell Ballard, “Let Our Voices Be Heard,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2003, 16. Incorporate some of Elder Ballard’s suggestions on minimizing the negative influences of media into your conclusion.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Citizenship and Social Development,” no. 9.

Lesson 47: Clean and Appropriate Speech

H. David Burton, “Standing Tall,” Liahona, Jan. 2002, 75; Ensign, Nov. 2001, 65. Use Bishop Burton’s second example when discussing how our speech reveals what is in our hearts.

Lesson 48: Maintaining Righteous Standards

James E. Faust, “Standing in Holy Places,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2005, 62. Use principles from the article to discuss how standing in holy places can help us be in the world but not of the world.

Duty to God (Teacher), “Family Activities,” no. 2.

Lesson 49: Honesty and Integrity

D. Todd Christofferson, “Let Us Be Men,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 46. Use ideas from the article as you conclude the lesson.

Richard C. Edgley, “Three Towels and a 25-Cent Newspaper,” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2006, 72. Replace the story at the end of the lesson with Bishop Edgley’s stories of his summer job and the newspapers.

Duty to God (Priest), “Spiritual Development,” no. 1.

Lesson 50: Valuing and Encouraging People with Disabilities

Monte J. Brough, “Adversity, the Great Teacher,” Ensign, Aug. 2006, 9. Use the story about Elder Brough’s mission.

Duty to God (Priest), “Physical Development,” no. 11.