Family Home Evening Ideas


This issue contains articles and activities that could be used for family home evening. The following are a few examples.

“Recognizing God’s Hand in Our Daily Blessings,” page 24: Consider reading the Lord’s Prayer (see Matthew 6:9–13) and asking your family what they think “give us this day our daily bread” means. Then summarize the first section of the article, where Elder Christofferson discusses “daily bread.” Consider adding your testimony that Jesus Christ is the Bread of Life.

“George Albert Smith: He Lived as He Taught,” page 32: President George Albert Smith “believed that if we truly have a testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ, it will manifest itself in our lives.” Review the article with your family. You might then ask family members what they learned from President Smith’s example of treating others with kindness. Ask how they can show more kindness.

“Look Up,” page 42: Consider sharing the experience that Elder Cook had as a young missionary and then summarize the remaining sections of the article. Ask family members how they can focus on what Heavenly Father thinks of them rather than what others think of them. You could conclude by reading 1 Samuel 16:7.

“Keeping Covenants,” page 48: If someone in your family is preparing to serve a mission, you may wish to read the article in its entirety and prepare a list of the significant points Elder Holland makes. Emphasize the statement “The key to this work is in keeping our covenants.” Review what a covenant is and ask children how they can prepare now to make covenants.

“He Is There,” page 69: Consider singing “A Child’s Prayer” (Children’s Songbook, 12). Read about Sister Wixom’s experience with prayer, and encourage family members to share their own experiences with personal prayer. You might ask, “Can you think of a time when you were comforted by praying?” Conclude with your testimony of prayer.

A Fun Activity, an Eternal Message

As a teenager I attended family home evening reluctantly. I thought I had better things to do.

One Monday night, after a few difficult FHEs, my mother wiped off the kitchen table and placed a small cherry pie in front of each of us. I eagerly looked around for forks—but there were none! Mom explained that we were having a pie-eating contest, but we could not use utensils or our hands. The winner got bragging rights.

We ate as fast as we could. Soon we had cherry pie covering the table, all over our faces, and even in our hair. I don’t remember who won, but I do remember laughing uncontrollably and truly enjoying my family. I didn’t realize it fully that night, but now I appreciate how nice it was to have a safe and loving place to call home and to have people who watched out for me.

I am sure we had a song and a lesson that night, and that it took my mother a lot of time to prepare and clean up. But I am grateful for an activity that taught a message about the importance of families that I needed—then and ever since.

Heather Mockler Teuscher, California, USA