Administer Appropriately in the Church Educational System

Administering Appropriately: A Handbook for CES Leaders and Teachers, (2003), 2–3


If leaders and teachers administer appropriately, each administrative duty will be done to assist Heavenly Father in His great work of inviting all to “come unto Christ, and be perfected in him” (Moroni 10:32; see also D&C 20:59).

Administering Appropriately

To administer appropriately in the Church Educational System is to assist the individual, the family, and priesthood leaders in accomplishing the mission of the Church by—

  • Providing Christlike leadership (see p. 18).

  • Administering in a manner that is consistent with gospel principles and CES policy (see p. 8).

  • Acquiring and using essential administrative skills (see p. 21).

  • Managing information, programs, and resources (see p. 24).

CES leaders and teachers are accountable to the Church Board of Education through appointed leaders (see p. 5); they are also to assist local priesthood leaders by enrolling, teaching, and serving students in approved CES programs.

Administrative duties, performed appropriately, lead to greater opportunities to minister to the needs and wants of individuals (see Mosiah 18:29). Each administrative duty is performed for the spiritual purpose of blessing individuals. Leading and serving personnel, preparing budgets, completing reports, caring for Church property and resources, ensuring safety, overseeing programs, and participating in councils are all essential administrative duties. Each duty contributes in a significant way to meeting the objective of religious education.

The Objective of Religious Education

The mission of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is to assist in the work of our Heavenly Father by inviting all to “come unto Christ, and be perfected in him” (Moroni 10:32; see also D&C 20:59). The objective of religious education grows out of that mission.

The objective of religious education in the Church Educational System is to assist the individual, the family, and priesthood leaders in accomplishing the mission of the Church by—

  1. 1.

    Teaching students the gospel of Jesus Christ as found in the standard works and the words of the prophets.

  2. 2.

    Teaching students by precept and example so they will be encouraged, assisted, and protected as they strive to live the gospel of Jesus Christ.

  3. 3.

    Providing a spiritual and social climate where students can associate together.

  4. 4.

    Preparing young people for effective Church service.

The Commission of CES Leaders and Teachers

To accomplish the objective of religious education, all CES leaders and teachers are given a commission1 to—

  1. 1.

    Live the gospel.

  2. 2.

    Teach effectively.

  3. 3.

    Administer appropriately.

Every CES administrator is also a teacher and is expected to teach effectively by both precept and example. Elder Gordon B. Hinckley, then a member of the Quorum of Twelve Apostles, declared: “Effective teaching is the very essence of leadership in the Church. Eternal life … will come only as men and women are taught with such effectiveness that they change and discipline their lives. They cannot be coerced into righteousness or into heaven. They must be led, and that means teaching” (as cited by Jeffrey R. Holland, in Conference Report, Apr. 1998, 31; or Ensign, May 1998, 26). While the primary function in CES is teaching, leaders and teachers also have administrative responsibilities, and they are expected to carry them out appropriately.

Basic Duties and Responsibilities

Each aspect of the commission of CES leaders and teachers includes the performance of some basic duties and responsibilities (see appendix, pp. 39–40). Basic duties and responsibilities expected of CES leaders and teachers are described in this handbook and in Teaching the Gospel: A Handbook for CES Teachers and Leaders (2001; item 34829). These CES handbooks are based upon gospel principles addressed in the standard works and the words of the prophets. Duties and responsibilities addressed in these handbooks form the foundation for assessment and training in CES. Leaders and teachers should identify and apply gospel principles as they strive to meet the objective, fulfill their commission, and perform basic duties and responsibilities.

Administrative duties, performed appropriately, lead to greater opportunities to minister to the needs and wants of individuals.

While the primary function in CES is teaching, leaders and teachers also have administrative responsibilities.

Show References

    Notes

  1.   1.

    See Teaching the Gospel: A Handbook for CES Teachers and Leaders (2001), 6–9.