Mormon 7-9

Book of Mormon Teacher Resource Manual, (2004), 247–252


Introduction

The final chapters of Mormon are directed to future generations who would have the Book of Mormon. Mormon and Moroni, after recording the fall of the Nephite nation, testify that the only way for us to avoid a similar fall is to have faith in Jesus Christ.

Some Important Gospel Principles to Look For

  • Believing in and obeying Jesus Christ is the way to avoid spiritual destruction and obtain salvation (see Mormon 7; see also John 14:6; Mormon 6:17–18).

  • When we follow the Savior’s example and choose the right, He will be with us, even if others turn against us (see Mormon 8:1–11; see also 1 Kings 19:10–14; John 16:32).

  • The Book of Mormon was prophesied to come forth in the latter days during a time of apostasy as another witness of Jesus Christ (see Mormon 7:8–9; 8:12–41).

  • Miracles, signs, and revelations are poured out on the faithful but cease when there is no faith (see Mormon 9:7–27).

  • The Fall of Adam brought physical and spiritual death to all mankind. Through the Atonement of Jesus Christ, all mankind will be resurrected and brought back into the Lord’s presence to be judged (see Mormon 9:11–14).

Additional Resources

  • Book of Mormon Student Manual: Religion 121 and 122, pp. 133–35.

Suggestions for Teaching

weekly iconMormon 7. Believing in and obeying Jesus Christ is the way to avoid spiritual destruction and obtain salvation. (25–30 minutes)

Write 230,000 on the board. Have students read Mormon 6:11–15 to determine what this number has to do with the Book of Mormon. To give students a sense of how many were slain, write on the board the population of the town or city where you live.

Draw the accompanying diagram on the board.

solid outline of body

Physical Body

dashed outline of body

Spirit Body

Read Mormon 6:17–18 and ask:

  • What caused the physical destruction of the Nephite nation?

  • What could have saved them from physical destruction?

  • Did the Nephites die physically or spiritually first?

  • Which death do you think is more tragic? Why?

Have students read Mormon 7:4–10 and underline what Mormon said we could do to avoid spiritual death. List their findings on the board. These might include:

  • Do not delight in bloodshed (see v. 4). (Note: Ask students how we can avoid delighting in bloodshed in time of peace. Answers might include avoiding violent movies, video games, and television shows.)

  • Repent (see v. 5).

  • Believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, that He was crucified, that He was resurrected, that He provides a resurrection for all, and that He will judge us all (see vv. 5–7).

  • Be baptized (see v. 8).

  • Accept and live the gospel of Christ (see v. 8).

  • Study the scriptures (see vv. 8–9).

  • Receive the Holy Ghost (see v. 10).

  • Follow the Savior’s example (see v. 10).

Ask: Which of these topics did Mormon spend the most time describing? (Believing in Christ; see vv. 5–7.)

Share the following statement by Bishop Richard C. Edgley, a member of the Presiding Bishopric:

“To those who wonder how Christ fits into our theology and our personal lives, we testify that Christ is the Redeemer of the world. He is our Lord, our Light, and our Savior. He was ordained from on high to descend below all, to suffer above all! He is the focus of all that we teach and all we do. As a Church we are individual Christians, trying to prove our discipleship to the Savior. It is not an institutional matter; it is a personal matter” (in Conference Report, Apr. 1998, 14; or Ensign, May 1998, 13).

Write the following questions on the board:

•How can you tell if Jesus Christ is the focus of your life?

•What could you do to make Him more a part of your life?

Briefly discuss these questions as a class, and then allow the students five minutes to write their personal answers on a piece of paper.

Mormon 8:1–11. When we follow the Savior’s example and choose the right, He will be with us, even if others turn against us. (10–15 minutes)

Share the following statement by Bishop Richard C. Edgley:

“Real courage includes standing against the evil one, even when we stand alone, often feeling the disdain and the ridicule of others. This is courage. This is strength. This is manhood, and it can be tough” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1999, 54–55; or Ensign, Nov. 1999, 42).

Ask students if they have ever felt alone or separated from friends or family after choosing the right. Invite a few students who would feel comfortable sharing their experiences to do so (be sure these are appropriate). Have a student read Mormon 8:1–11 and ask:

  • How do you think Moroni felt in this situation?

  • How do you think you would feel?

  • How does that compare to the times you felt alone after choosing the right?

Have students compare the dates for Mormon 8 and Moroni 10 (see the footnotes in these chapters) and ask:

  • About how many years was Moroni alone? (At least twenty-one.)

  • What other people in the scriptures had to stand alone? (see 1 Kings 19:10–14; John 16:32).

  • How can it help us, when we feel alone in doing what is right, to know that others have had the same experience?

  • Read Mormon 8:34. Who remained with Moroni?

  • How does that apply to us when we are left alone after choosing the right?

Read or sing “Abide with Me” (Hymns, no. 166). Testify that the Lord will be with us when we choose the right, even though others may not.

Mormon 7:8–9; 8:12–41. The Book of Mormon was prophesied to come forth in the latter days during a time of apostasy as another witness of Jesus Christ. (30–35 minutes)

Ask students:

  • What events are you familiar with that require witnesses? (Baptism, marriage, trials in courts of law.)

  • Why is it important to have witnesses at these events?

Ask students if they have ever seen or read two news reports covering the same event. Ask:

  • Were the reports exactly the same? Why or why not?

  • What is the value of having more than one witness to an event?

Invite students to read Mormon 7:8–9 and look for the two records mentioned by Mormon (the Bible and the Book of Mormon). Ask:

  • What are some truths that both the Book of Mormon and the Bible testify of?

  • What is the value of having both these books? (Point out that the Book of Mormon includes many truths that are not found or are not taught as plainly in the Bible.)

  • How does your belief in one of these books affect your belief in the other?

Invite students to read Mormon 8:12–41. Have them list on a piece of paper all the information they can find about the Book of Mormon in these verses, and discuss their findings. Their lists might include the following:

  • Those who believe in the Book of Mormon will be given “greater things” (v. 12).

  • The gold plates cannot be used to get rich (see v. 14).

  • The Book of Mormon is of great spiritual value (see v. 14).

  • The one who would bring forth the book (Joseph Smith) would be blessed (see vv. 14–16).

  • The Book of Mormon would be published for the welfare of the Lord’s ancient covenant people (Israel; see v. 15).

  • The Book of Mormon would come to the knowledge of the people by the power of God (see v. 16).

  • Those who condemn the Book of Mormon will be condemned of the Lord (see vv. 17–19).

  • People would try to stop the Book of Mormon from coming forth (see vv. 18–21).

  • Isaiah prophesied of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon (see v. 23).

  • The ancient prophets of the Book of Mormon will speak “from the dust” to us (v. 23; see vv. 23–26).

  • The Book of Mormon would come at a time of apostasy and wickedness:

  • People would deny miracles and the power of God (see vv. 26, 28).

  • People would kill the righteous and build up secret combinations (see v. 27).

  • False churches would be lifted up in pride, teach false doctrine, love money, and neglect the poor (see vv. 28, 32–33, 36–39).

  • There would be fires, tempests, earthquakes, wars, and rumors of war (see vv. 29–30).

  • People would murder, rob, lie, and break the law of chastity (see v. 31).

Share the following statement by President Ezra Taft Benson.

“My beloved brethren and sisters, today I would like to speak about one of the most significant gifts given to the world in modern times. The gift I am thinking of is more important than any of the inventions that have come out of the industrial and technological revolutions. This is a gift of greater value to mankind than even the many wonderful advances we have seen in modern medicine. It is of greater worth to mankind than the development of flight or space travel. I speak of the gift of the Book of Mormon. …

“This gift was prepared by the hand of the Lord over a period of more than a thousand years. …

“Once we realize how the Lord feels about this book, it should not surprise us that He also gives us solemn warnings about how we receive it. After indicating that those who receive the Book of Mormon with faith, working righteousness, will receive a crown of eternal glory (see D&C 20:14), the Lord follows with this warning: ‘But those who harden their hearts in unbelief, and reject it, it shall turn to their own condemnation’ (D&C 20:15)” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1986, 3; or Ensign, Nov. 1986, 4).

Paraphrase for students the three great reasons President Benson gave that Latter-day Saints should study the Book of Mormon (see the teaching suggestion for 2 Nephi 30:1–8, p. 75). Then read this additional excerpt from President Benson’s talk:

“There is a power in the book which will begin to flow into your lives the moment you begin a serious study of the book. You will find greater power to resist temptation. You will find the power to avoid deception. You will find the power to stay on the strait and narrow path. …

“Brethren and sisters, I implore you with all my heart that you consider with great solemnity the importance of the Book of Mormon to you personally and to the Church collectively” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1986, 6; or Ensign, Nov. 1986, 7).

Mormon 9:1–6. God extends His mercies even to the wicked in allowing them to have a measure of glory in the life to come. (10–15 minutes)

Write Peaceful and Uneasy on the board. Invite six students to each read one of the following examples to the class. After each example, ask students whether they would feel at peace or uneasy if they were in a similar situation.

  • Joshua is fifteen years old. Many of his friends of the same age have dates for an upcoming school activity and are encouraging him to get a date as well.

  • José attends an area conference where the prophet speaks. Afterward he is invited to the stand to shake hands with the prophet.

  • Fiona is attending a party with her friends. One of her friends invites the group to watch a video with lots of profanity and crude jokes.

  • Yves loves sports, but a member of his team swears every time someone makes a mistake in a game.

  • Nadya is called to serve as president of her Young Women class.

  • Kamau is the high school debate president. After his team wins a debate away from home, some of his friends break out some alcohol to celebrate and ask him to join them.

Ask:

  • What can influence people to feel differently in the same setting?

  • Can people change how they feel about situations?

Read Isaiah 6:1, 5–7 and ask:

  • How did Isaiah feel when he was brought into the presence of God?

  • Read Alma 36:12–14. How is Alma’s experience like what Isaiah describes?

  • If a prophet like Isaiah felt unworthy in the presence of God, how do you think the wicked would feel?

  • According to Isaiah 6:6–7, what happened to help Isaiah feel more worthy in the presence of the Lord?

  • Read Alma 36:18–20. According to these verses, what happened to help Alma feel joy?

Invite students to read Mormon 9:1–6, and ask:

  • Who is Moroni speaking to in these verses? (see vv. 1–2).

  • What will happen at the Second Coming of Jesus Christ? (see v. 2).

  • How would the wicked feel to dwell with the Lord? (see vv. 3–4).

  • Read Doctrine and Covenants 88:32. According to this verse, why can’t some people “enjoy” the presence of the Lord? (They are not willing.)

  • In what way is it merciful for the Lord to prepare glories according to the righteousness of the people?

  • What can we do to feel more worthy to be in the presence of the Lord? (see Mormon 9:6).

Share the following statement by Elder Lorenzo Snow, who was then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve:

“God loves His offspring, the human family. … He loves them all and His plans are for the salvation of the whole, and He will bring all up into that position in which they will be as happy and as comfortable as they are willing to be” (The Teachings of Lorenzo Snow, comp. Clyde J. Williams [1984], 91).

Mormon 9:7–27. Miracles, signs, and revelations are poured out on the faithful but cease when there is no faith. (35–40 minutes)

Invite students to list some of the miracles Jesus performed. (You could write these on the board.) Ask:

  • Which of these miracles is most impressive to you?

  • How would you feel if you witnessed these miracles?

  • What similar miracles happen today?

Have students read Mark 5:35–42, and ask:

  • Who did Jesus take with Him?

  • Who did Jesus “put out” of the room?

  • Why do you think He had them leave before He raised the girl from the dead?

Write the following matching exercise on the board, or give it to students as a handout. Have students match the numbered items in the left column to the corresponding lettered items in the right column.

Mormon 9:7–24

1. Moroni spoke to .

A. They would cast out devils and speak with new tongues, poisons would not hurt them, and they would heal the sick.

2. What did these people not know?

B. Variableness neither shadow of changing.

3. What had they not read?

C. Unbelief, departing from the right way, and knowing not God.

4. With God there is no .

D. Those who deny the revelations of God.

5. The plan of salvation includes these three major principles or events.

E. The gospel of Christ.

6. Moroni described God’s miracles as .

F. The creation of heaven, earth, and man.

7. Moroni gave these examples of God’s miracles.

G. The scriptures.

8. Who did Moroni say had done miracles?

H. Jesus and His Apostles.

9. What three reasons did Moroni list for why miracles cease?

I. Marvelous.

10. What signs or miracles did Moroni say would follow those who believe?

J. The Creation, Fall, and redemption.

(Answers: 1–D, 2–E, 3–G, 4–B, 5–J, 6–I, 7–F, 8–H, 9–C, 10–A)

Ask:

  • What principles of the gospel need to be present for miracles to occur? (Faith and in many cases prayer and priesthood power.)

  • In what ways has the Holy Ghost comforted, warned, or taught you?

  • What are some of God’s miracles that are all around us? (The birth of a baby, the creation of the earth, the Restoration of the Gospel, patriarchal blessings.)

  • Read Mormon 9:21, 27–28. According to these verses, how can having faith in Jesus Christ, not doubting, and living righteously help prepare you to experience miracles?

Mormon 9:11–14. The Fall of Adam brought physical and spiritual death to all mankind. Through the Atonement of Jesus Christ, all mankind will be resurrected and brought back into the Lord’s presence to be judged. (20–25 minutes)

Give students the following quiz (allow them to use their scriptures):

  1. 1.

    According to Moses 4:25, what was one result of the Fall of Adam? (Physical death.)

  2. 2.

    According to Doctrine and Covenants 29:41, what was another result of the Fall of Adam? (Spiritual death.)

  3. 3.

    According to Alma 42:9, what is spiritual death?

  4. 4.

    According to 1 Corinthians 15:22, what is one result of the Atonement of Christ?

Fall of
Adam Atonement of
Jesus Christ

1. Brought physical death.

arrow

1. Provides Resurrection.

2. Brought first spiritual death.

arrow

2. Provides for a return to presence of God for judgment.

Draw the accompanying diagram on the board, but leave the answers in the right-hand column blank. Ask the following questions, and fill in the right-hand column as students respond:

  • What has the Lord done to overcome physical death for all?

  • How does He help each of us overcome spiritual death?

Read as a class Mormon 9:11–14, and discuss the following questions:

  • What did God create? (see vv. 11–12).

  • What did Adam and Eve bring about? (see v. 12).

  • What occurred to help us overcome the Fall of Adam? (see v. 12).

  • What does the Atonement of Jesus Christ provide? (Redemption; see v. 12.)

  • What happens to man as a result of the plan of redemption? (We will be resurrected and brought back into the presence of the Lord; see v. 13.)

  • How many people are saved from physical death through the redemption of Christ?

  • How many people are saved from the first spiritual death through the redemption of Christ?

  • What follows this redemption? (see v. 14).

  • Read Helaman 14:15–19. According to these verses, what will happen to those who are brought back into the presence of God and are found to be “filthy still”?

  • How does knowing about the Savior’s Atonement affect your feelings toward Him?

As a summary you may want to invite a student to tell how the effects of the Fall of Adam have been overcome by the Savior.