Appendix 7

Administrator Biographies

“Appendix 7: Administrator Biographies,” By Study and Also by Faith—One Hundred Years of Seminaries and Institutes of Religion (2015)


Dee F. Andersen (1931– ) Born in Ogden, Utah. Married to Francis Nicholas; seven children. He had various business experience when he accepted a position at the University of Utah as a controller, where he became acquainted with Neal A. Maxwell. In 1970 Commissioner Maxwell asked him to serve as an associate commissioner of education over finance. In 1973 Andersen was asked by President Harold B. Lee to lead the reorganizing of the budgetary system for the entire Church. He served in that capacity until 1974, when he returned to the University of Utah as an administrative vice president. In 1976 he returned to the Church to serve as executive assistant to the Presiding Bishopric. Andersen later served as the coordinator of long-term planning. He eventually left to serve as the administrative vice president of Brigham Young University until his retirement in 1994. After his retirement he served as a mission president in Hawaii, as president of the Mount Timpanogos Utah Temple, and as a public affairs missionary in Ohio.

Grant C. Anderson (1956– ) Born in Whittier, California. Married to Martine Fiddler; two children. He began teaching seminary at Mesa High School in Mesa, Arizona, and also taught in Mission Viejo and Hemet, California. He also served as an institute teacher and coordinator at institutes in Pleasant Hill and Stockton, California. In 2001 he accepted a position to serve as the area director of the U.S. Northern Plains Area. In 2004 he was asked to serve as assistant administrator and remained in that position until 2009, when he was appointed as the director of the Salt Lake University Institute of Religion.

William R. Applegarth (1942– ) Born in Inglewood, California. Married to Jeanne Hunting; eight children. He joined the Church in 1964 and began teaching seminary in 1967. He taught seminary at East High in Salt Lake City, Utah, for six years and served as a principal at seminaries in Highland, Olympus, and Kearns, Utah. He later served as an associate area director for three years and as regional coordinator and institute director in Moscow, Idaho, for four years. He then returned to Salt Lake City to serve as principal at the Cottonwood seminary for the next 10 years. He subsequently served as area director for the Utah Valley North Area for three years and the Salt Lake Valley South Area for one year. In 2002 he was appointed as an assistant administrator and served in that capacity until his retirement in 2006.

John C. Beck (1957– ) Born in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Married to Gwen Mecham; four children. He is a member of the Catawba Indian tribe. John began his teaching career in 1985 at the Skyline seminary in Salt Lake City, where he was assigned until 1994. While at Skyline he also coordinated the seminary teaching efforts at Ben Franklin Academy. In 1994 he was appointed as principal of East seminary in Salt Lake City, where he served until 1998, when he was invited to serve as the area director of the Salt Lake Valley West Area. In 2001 he was appointed as an assistant administrator. He served in that position until 2005, when he was called to serve as the president of the California Fresno Mission. Upon his return in 2008 he was invited to serve as the area director of the Salt Lake Valley South Area.

Kenneth H. Beesley (1926– ) Born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Married to Donna Deem; five children. He served as an assistant provost and an assistant professor at Columbia University in New York City, New York, and later as the executive dean at Fresno State College in California. In 1970 Commissioner Neal A. Maxwell asked him to serve as an associate commissioner of education over Church schools, including the Church College of Hawaii, Ricks College, LDS Business College, and all Church elementary and secondary schools. He served in that position for 10 years, departing in 1980 to serve in the International Materials Management Department for the Church. In 1986 Beesley was asked to serve as the president of LDS Business College. He served in that position until his retirement in 1991. From 1991 to 1993 he and his wife served as the first missionary couple in Mongolia. Since their return, Brother Beesley has continued to actively serve in the Church.

Adam S. Bennion (1886–1958) Born in Taylorsville, Utah. Married to Minerva Richards Young; five children. He received his BS degree at the University of Utah in 1908, completed an MA at Columbia University, and completed a PhD at the University of California, Berkeley. He served as principal at Granite High School when the first seminary was established there. Bennion was appointed a member of the Church Board of Education in 1915 and as superintendent of Church schools in 1919, serving until 1928. After leaving the post of superintendent, he continued to serve on the Church Board of Education until 1935. He was called as an Apostle in 1953.

William E. Berrett (1902–1993) Born in Union, Utah. Married to Eleanor Louise Callister; four children. He began teaching seminary in 1925. He also served as an editor for the religious education department and authored many texts and manuals. Berrett left Church education in 1943 to work as an attorney, serving in the United States Office of Price Administration and as an assistant U.S. attorney in Fairbanks, Alaska. He returned to Church education as a professor of religion at Brigham Young University in 1949. In 1953 he was appointed vice president of BYU and vice administrator of Church schools in charge of religious education (including seminaries and institutes). He served in this dual capacity until 1965, when he was named administrator of the seminaries and institutes of religion. After his retirement in 1970 he worked to compile the history of seminaries and institutes, eventually writing the first published history of these programs, A Miracle in Weekday Religious Education, published in 1988.

Frank M. Bradshaw (1928–2006) Born in Mt. View, Wyoming. Married to Helen Bergstedt; five children. He began his teaching career at the Olympus seminary in Holladay, Utah, in 1955, serving as a teacher and later principal. In 1960 he moved to San Luis Obispo, California, to serve as institute and seminary supervisor. He taught institute classes at various institutes in California. In 1964 he became division coordinator for Southern California, and in 1968 he was asked to serve as administrative assistant to William E. Berrett. In this capacity he assisted in Lambda Delta Sigma, a student association for LDS students. He was appointed a zone administrator in 1972. In this capacity he supervised programs in Mexico, South America, and Africa, serving for nearly two decades. In 1990 he left the central office to serve as area director in Southern California, where he served until his retirement in 1993.

Russell G. Bulloch (1957– ) Born in St. George, Utah. Married to Ellen Anderson; four children. He began teaching seminary in 1985 at the Provo, Utah, seminary and became its principal in 1993. In 1996 he was appointed principal of the seminary adjacent to Timpview High School in Provo, Utah, where he served until 1998, when he began serving as a preservice trainer in Cedar City, Utah. In 2002 he became area director of the Salt Lake Valley East Area. He was appointed an assistant administrator in 2005. He served in that position until 2007, when he was called to serve as president of the Mexico City East Mission. Upon his return in 2010, he began serving as the area director of the Utah Valley North Area. He returned to the central office as an assistant administrator in 2012.

Alma P. Burton (1913–1998) Born in Nephi, Utah. Married to Clea Rich Morgan; five children. He served as superintendent of the Alpine School District, as dean of Admissions and Records at BYU, and as a professor of Church history and doctrine at Brigham Young University. Burton is the author of several influential texts and coauthored a series with William E. Berrett. He was appointed an assistant administrator of religious education in 1961, serving until his retirement in 1970. He served as a stake president, on the General Board of the Mutual Improvement Association, director of the Independence Missouri Information Center, and president of the Manti Utah Temple.

J. Elliot Cameron (1923–2011) Born in Panguitch, Utah. Married to Maxine Petty; four children. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He later attended the University of Utah, Utah State University, and Southern Utah State College, eventually earning a PhD. He served as principal of Duchesne High School in 1949. From 1950 to 1953 he was principal of South Sevier High School, and from 1953 to 1956 he served as superintendent of the Sevier School District. In 1956 he was appointed the president of Snow College in Ephraim, Utah. He later served as dean of student services at Utah State University, and in 1962 he became the dean of students at Brigham Young University (in 1972 his title was changed to dean of student life). In 1980 he was appointed president of BYU–Hawaii. In 1986 he was invited to serve as Church commissioner of education, continuing until 1989, when he retired. After his retirement he and his wife presided over the Provo Utah Temple.

Joe J. Christensen (1929– ) Born in Banida, Idaho. Married to Barbara Kohler; six children. He began teaching at the Granite High seminary in Salt Lake City in 1955. He served as the institute director at Washington State University, the Moscow, Idaho, institute, and at the University of Utah. In 1970 he received a call to serve as president of the Mexico City Mission with his wife. Only a few months later he was brought back to serve as an associate commissioner over religious education under Commissioner Neal A. Maxwell. He served in this capacity until 1979, when he was called to serve as president of the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. In 1985 he was appointed president of Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho. He was called to the First Quorum of the Seventy in 1989, eventually serving in the Presidency of the Seventy for over six years. He received emeritus status in 1999. He and his wife presided over the San Diego California Temple from 1999 until 2002.

Roger G. Christensen (1953– ) Born in Concord, California. Married to Christine Baker; 11 children. He worked as an accountant in the professional sector for about a decade until he was hired as an auditor for the Church in 1990. He was asked to serve as Church budget officer from 1994 to 1999. In 1999 he joined the Church Educational System, serving as secretary to the Church Board of Education and the Board of Trustees. During that time he also served as the assistant to the Commissioner of the Church Educational System. He was released from that position in 2014, when he was called as a mission president in Quito, Ecuador.

Ross H. Cole (1942– ) Born in Compton, California. Married to Charlene Zimmerman; six children. He began teaching in Tempe, Arizona, in 1970. During his career he served as teacher, area coordinator, and institute teacher in Arizona and California; head of preservice training and assistant to the area director over the Southern California area; an institute director; and a teaching support consultant for early-morning teachers. In 1986 he moved to Church headquarters to serve as the first director of teacher training. He helped develop the Professional Development Program (PDP). In 1989 he was called as a mission president in Korea. He returned to the central office in 1992 to resume his role as director of teacher training, launching the first apprentice seminar. In 1994 he was appointed an assistant administrator, where he served until his retirement in 2004.

Horace H. Cummings (1858–1937) Born in Provo, Utah. Married to Barbara Matilda Moses and Matilda Sophia Wilcox Bliss; nine children. He was a teacher in Millcreek, Utah, and at Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah. He served a mission in Mexico from 1885 to 1887. In 1905 he was appointed the superintendent of Church schools, and he assisted in the creation of the first released-time seminary programs. He continued to serve as superintendent until his retirement in 1919.

Franklin D. Day (1920–2013) Born in Hunter, Utah. Married to Mary Jane Brown; five children. He began teaching at the Panguitch, Utah, seminary in 1951 and in 1954 transferred to Shelley, Idaho, as the seminary principal. In 1957 he returned to Southern Utah as a district seminary coordinator. He was appointed director of the institute in Cedar City, Utah, in 1961 and served until 1966, when he was asked to serve as the division coordinator for the eastern states. In 1968 he was named assistant administrator of seminaries and institutes under William E. Berrett. He continued in that role after Joe J. Christensen took Berrett’s place as head of seminaries and institutes in 1970. Day also served as a zone administrator for several different areas including Asia, the Pacific, and the western United States. He was appointed associate commissioner over the central office in 1979 and served in that capacity until his retirement in 1986.

Henry B. Eyring (1933– ) Born in Princeton, New Jersey. Married to Kathleen Johnson; six children. He served as an associate professor of business at Stanford University from 1962 to 1971. In 1971 he received an appointment to serve as president of Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho. In 1977 he was appointed deputy commissioner of the Church Educational System under Commissioner Jeffrey R. Holland. He was appointed Commissioner of the Church Educational System in 1980 and served in that role until 1985. He served as first counselor in the Presiding Bishopric from 1985 until 1992, when he was appointed as Commissioner of the Church Educational System again, serving in that role until 2005. In 1995, during his second term as Commissioner, he was called as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He was called to be the First Counselor in the First Presidency in February 2008.

Randall L. Hall (1948– ) Born in Logan, Utah. Married to Lloya Frey; 11 children. He began teaching seminary in 1973. In 1980 he helped open a new seminary at Mountain View High School in Orem, Utah. In 1981 he joined the curriculum staff in the central office, later serving as manager of seminary curriculum. In 1989 he returned to Mountain View as the seminary principal, where he served for four years. In 1993 he moved to Brigham Young University to serve as a preservice director, and in 1995 he was appointed area director of the Utah Valley South Area. In 1997 he was appointed a zone administrator. In 2007 he became associate administrator under Garry K. Moore and later served under Chad H Webb until his retirement in 2013.

Richard D. Hawks (1966– ) Born in Garden Grove, California. Married to Natalie Johnson; five children. He began teaching seminary in Orem, Utah, in 1992. In 1997 he moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to serve as a coordinator working with locally called seminary and institute teachers. During that time he earned a PhD in educational leadership from the University of Minnesota. In 2003 he joined the training services division in the central office. In 2007 he was invited to serve as an assistant administrator. He continues to serve in that position at the time of this publication.

R. Kelly Haws (1958– ) Born in American Fork, Utah. Married to Connie Dee Thornwall; three children. He began teaching seminary in West Jordan, Utah, in 1984. He later served as the seminary coordinator in Washington, D.C. In 1998 he was appointed area director for the U.S. East Area. In 2007 he joined the training services division in the central office. He was appointed an assistant administrator in 2008, with responsibilities covering Canada, the Caribbean, Africa, and several other areas. In 2013 he was appointed associate administrator of Seminaries and Institutes of Religion.

Jeffrey R. Holland (1940– ) Born in St. George, Utah. Married to Patricia Terry; three children. He taught in the College of Religious Instruction at Brigham Young University while earning a master’s degree, then joined Seminaries and Institutes of Religion as the head of the Hayward, California, institute. After a year in Hayward, he accepted a position at the institute located at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. While completing doctorate work at Yale University, he taught institute classes at Yale and Amherst. Upon his return from Yale he taught briefly at the Salt Lake City institute. In 1974 he was appointed dean of the College of Religious Instruction at BYU. In 1976 he was invited to serve as commissioner of the Church Educational System, serving until 1980, when he was appointed as president of BYU. He served there until 1989, when he was called as a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy. In 1994 he was called as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

G. Bradly Howell (1960– ) Born in Eugene, Oregon. Married to Lori Elmore; four children. He began his teaching career at the Thatcher, Arizona, seminary in 1989. In 1994 he moved to the central office, where he worked as an instructional designer on products such as the Teacher Improvement Package (TIP). In 1999 he transferred to the Ogden, Utah, institute to serve as a teacher and preservice trainer. He served there until 2002, when he was invited to serve as a zone administrator; that title later changed to assistant administrator. He continued to serve in that role until 2012, when he became the head of the preservice program.

Stephen K. Iba (1944– ) Born in Holiday, Utah. Married to Patricia Prater; six children. He began teaching seminary in 1969. In 1973 he accepted an assignment to launch seminary and institute programs in the Philippines. He stayed there until 1975, when he accepted a position in the religion department at Brigham Young University. In 1977 he was called as a mission president in Manila, Philippines. When he returned in 1980 he served as a curriculum writer in the central office. In 1981 he began serving as the director of preservice training at the Salt Lake City institute. In 1987 he became area director in Salt Lake City. He was asked to serve as an zone administrator in 1990 and continued in that role until 2005, when he left to serve as area director of the Pacific Islands Area. He stayed there until his retirement in 2007.

Paul V. Johnson (1954– ) Born in Gainesville, Florida. Married to Leslie Jill Washburn; nine children. He began his teaching career in Chandler, Arizona, in 1978. In 1989 he came into the central office to work as an instructional designer, eventually serving as manager of the media team. During his time in the central office he served as director of design and evaluation services, director of training services, and then as director of curriculum and training services during a period when the two divisions were combined. In 1999 he accepted an appointment to serve as a zone administrator over the central office’s Instructional Services Zone. He continued there until 2001, when he was appointed Church Educational System administrator over religious education and elementary and secondary education. In 2005 he was called as a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy. He left his post as an administrator in 2007 to serve as a member of the Chile Area Presidency. He returned to Church education in 2008 when he was called as Commissioner of the Church Educational System.

W. Rolfe Kerr (1935– ) Born in Tremonton, Utah. Married to Janeil Raybold; six children. He attended Utah State University, earning a master’s and doctorate degree in education. He held administrative positions at Utah State University, Weber State University, and Brigham Young University and served as president of Dixie College in St. George, Utah. He was serving as the Utah Commissioner of Higher Education when he was called as a mission president in Dallas, Texas, in 1993. In 1996 he was called as a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy. In 2005 he was appointed as Commissioner of the Church Educational System and served until 2008, when he and his wife were called to preside over the Logan Utah Temple, where they served until 2011.

Bruce M. Lake (1935– ) Born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Married to Patricia Goalen; five children. After serving as an early-morning seminary teacher in Salt Lake City for three years, he began teaching at the seminary at East High in Salt Lake City in 1961. In 1963 he moved to Southern California to teach at several different institute programs while completing doctorate work at the University of Southern California. During this time he helped develop and launched the Latter-day Saint Student Association (LDSSA). In 1967 he was appointed area coordinator for Southern California. In 1969 he moved to Logan, Utah, to serve as area coordinator for northern Utah, western Wyoming, and southeastern Idaho. He left Church education in 1970 to accept a position as director of the BYU Salt Lake Center for Continuing Education. He remained there until 1973, when he accepted the position of associate dean of students at the University of Utah. A year later Joe J. Christensen invited him to serve as one of three zone administrators over Seminaries and Institutes of Religion. He continued in that position until he retired in 1999.

Gerald N. Lund (1939– ) Born in Fountain Green, Utah. Married to R. Lynn Stanard; seven children. His teaching career began in 1965 in Midvale, Utah. After two and half years he left to teach seminary at Brigham Young High School in Provo, Utah, for one year while completing a master’s degree. Afterward he was assigned to Walnut, California, serving as the director for the institute program at Mount San Antonio College. During this time he studied at Pepperdine University. In 1974, he was assigned to the central office, eventually serving as director of college curriculum, and later as director of training. In 1986 he was appointed as the first zone administrator over the central office, serving there until his retirement in 1999. In 2002 he was called as a member of the Second Quorum of the Seventy, a position he served in until being released in 2008.

Richard R. Lyman (1879–1963) Born in Fillmore, Utah. Married to Amy Brown; two children. He attended Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah, and Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah. He later attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and earned a doctorate degree in engineering from Cornell University. He served as head of the Department of Engineering at the University of Utah. In 1918 he was ordained as an Apostle and he then served as Assistant Commissioner of Education under then-Elder David O. McKay, who was Church Commissioner of Education. He then served as president of the European Mission from 1936 to 1938. He was excommunicated in 1943 but was rebaptized in 1954.

Karl G. Maeser (1828–1901) Born in Saxony, Germany. Married to Anna Meith and Emilie Damke; seven children. After converting to the Church in 1855, he immigrated to Utah the next year, serving two missions along the way, in the British Isles and in the Southern States. After serving as a teacher and school administrator for several years, he served a third mission to Germany and Switzerland from 1867 to 1870. In 1875 he was appointed as the principal of Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah. In 1888 he was appointed as the general superintendent of Church schools, a position he held until his death.

Benjamin I. Martinez (1934– ) Born in Yuba City, California. Married to Meredith Austin; five children. His schooling included a master’s and a doctorate degree, both from Stanford University. In 1972 he was appointed to the new position of administrator of Church schools in Latin America. He served in that role until 1977, when the hierarchy of the Church schools was reorganized and he was appointed a zone administrator. In 1979 he was called as the president of the Mexico Mérida Mission. In 1981 he returned and took a position as an institute teacher until he retired in 1989. After his retirement he served as a regional representative from 1991 to 1992, and he and his wife presided over the Guatemala City Guatemala Temple from 2006 to 2009.

Neal A. Maxwell (1926–2004) Born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Married to Colleen Fern Hinckley; four children. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, fighting in Okinawa. Upon his return, he served a mission in Eastern Canada from 1947 to 1949. He attended the University of Utah, and then from 1952 to 1956 he worked for U.S. Senator Wallace F. Bennett. He later served as dean of students and executive vice president at the University of Utah. In 1970 he was appointed Church Commissioner of Education. In 1974 he was called as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. In 1976 he left the Commissioner’s office to serve in the Presidency of the Quorum of the Seventy. In 1981 he was ordained as an Apostle.

David O. McKay (1873–1970) Born in Huntsville, Utah. Married to Emma Ray Riggs; seven children. He attended the Weber Stake Academy and later the University of Utah. He was the first Church President to hold a college degree. He served a mission in Scotland from 1897 to 1899. Upon his return he began teaching at the Weber Stake Academy in 1899, later becoming its principal in 1902. In 1906 he was called as an Apostle. In 1919 he was appointed the first Church Commissioner of Education. In 1920 he embarked on a tour of all Church missions worldwide. In 1922 he was appointed President of the European Mission. He became President of the Church in 1951, presiding over an unprecedented period of international and educational expansion.

Joseph F. Merrill (1868–1952) Born in Richmond, Utah. Married to Annie Laura Hyde; six children. After the death of his first wife, he married Emily Traub. He was appointed head of the School of Mines and Engineering at the University of Utah in 1899, remaining there until 1928. In 1912 he was a key figure in the creation of the released-time seminary program. In 1928 he was appointed as Church Commissioner of Education. During his service he was instrumental in the creation of the institutes of religion program and in the divestment of a number of smaller Church colleges to state control. He was called as an Apostle in 1931. In 1933 he was released as Commissioner and was appointed President of the European Mission until 1936. After his return he remained a strong advocate for education in the Church.

John A. Monson (1967– ) Born in Logan, Utah. Married to Alisa Payne; four children. He began teaching in 1992 in Rexburg, Idaho. In 1997 he moved to Bloomington, Indiana, to pursue doctorate work at Indiana University. While there he taught institute and coordinated the stake seminary programs in Bloomington, Indianapolis, and Muncie. In 2001 he returned to Utah, where he was asked to serve in the central office as a member of the training team. He later served as a manager for instructional design and as the director of training services. In 2005 he was invited to serve as an assistant administrator, representing areas in the United States, Europe, and Africa. He continued to serve in that capacity until 2010, when he was appointed director of Seminaries and Institutes of Religion information services.

Garry K. Moore (1942– ) Born in Alamosa, Colorado. Married to LaNell Lines; eight children. His teaching career began in 1966 at the seminary adjacent to Bonneville High School in Ogden, Utah. After a year and half, he was asked to move to Calgary, Canada, to run the institute program there. After a year in Canada he left Church education to pursue a career in the banking industry. Two years later he returned to serve as the institute director in Santa Maria, California. He later served as an area director in the eastern United States and eastern Canada. In 1984 he was offered a position as a zone administrator—he served as the administrator over Asia, the Pacific, and North America. From 1994 to 1997 he served as a mission president in Buenos Aries, Argentina. Upon his return he served as the zone administrator for the central office. In 2002 he was appointed executive assistant to the administrator and later served as an associate administrator. In 2007 he was appointed as the administrator over all religious education and elementary and secondary education. He continued in that role until his retirement in 2008. After his retirement he presided over the Madrid Spain Temple with his wife from 2008 to 2011.

Kenneth H. Myers (1941–2002) Born in Pocatello, Idaho. Married to Gisela Zander; six children. He began teaching in 1967. In 1970 he moved to Vermont to launch the first early-morning and home-study programs in that state. In 1971 he traveled to the United Kingdom to assist in establishing the seminary and institute programs in Europe. In 1972 he started the first programs in West Germany and surrounding countries. In 1975 he was called to serve as a mission president in Munich, Germany, and later was transferred to the mission in Vienna, Austria. In 1978 he returned to the United States, serving as director of the Moscow, Idaho, institute. He left Church education to serve in private business for over a decade but later returned in 1992. He was appointed a zone administrator in 1999, where he served until he passed away in 2002.

Boyd K. Packer (1924– ) Born in Brigham City, Utah. Married to Donna Smith; 10 children. His teaching career began in 1947 in Brigham City, Utah. He taught there for six years, also working to develop the Indian Seminary Program. In 1953 he was invited to serve as a supervisor over seminaries and institutes by President William E. Berrett. He continued to serve as a supervisor until 1961, when he was called as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. In 1970 he was called as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. In 2008 he was set apart as the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Stanley A. Peterson (1938– ) Born in Sacramento, California. Married to Anna Josephson; six children. He taught in public schools in Southern California while completing graduate work at the University of Southern California. In 1968 he accepted a position as chairman of the Brigham Young University California Center for Continuing Education. In 1970 he was appointed the associate dean of continuing education at BYU. In 1971 he became the dean of continuing education. In 1977 he was appointed as an associate commissioner of Church education under Commissioner Jeffrey R. Holland. As the other commissioners received new assignments, he remained, serving as administrator over religious education and Church schools. He was officially appointed administrator of religious education and elementary and secondary education in 1989, where he remained until his retirement in 2001.

Stephen L Richards (1879–1959) Born in Mendon, Utah. Married to Irene Smith Merrill; nine children. He attended the University of Utah and later studied law at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago before completing his law degree in 1901. He was called as an Apostle in 1917. In 1919 he was appointed as an Assistant Commissioner of Education under Elder David O. McKay, who was then the Commissioner. In 1951 he was called as the First Counselor in the First Presidency, a position he served in until his death.

Clarence F. Schramm (1931– ) Born in Payson, Utah. Married to Doris Jean Parker; three children. He served in the Korean War, and when he returned he attended Brigham Young University. He later served as a missionary in the Northern States Mission. He began teaching seminary in 1958 in Roosevelt, Utah. In 1963 he moved to California to teach institute and eventually became an institute director. He later served as coordinator (area director) of the California North Area. In 1981 he moved to the central office to serve as a zone administrator. In 1990 he was appointed executive assistant to the administrator, serving there until his retirement in 1997. In 1998 he and his wife were called to serve as CES missionaries in Boston, Massachusetts, where they served until 1999.

G. Paul Sorenson (1937– ) Born in Montpelier, Idaho. Married to Sylvia May Cropper; five children. He began teaching institute part-time in 1962 but began full-time employment a year later. In 1964 he transferred to Flagstaff, Arizona, to serve as the coordinator for early-morning seminary and for Indian seminaries. After two years in Flagstaff, he moved to Orem and taught seminary and institute. In 1967 he returned to Arizona to serve as an institute director. In 1970 he left Church education to pursue private business interests. He returned in 1975, serving in the central office as assistant to Harold Western, the associate commissioner over finance and budgets. Sorenson also served as financial officer for Church elementary and secondary schools. In 1993 he became the administrator of finance and budgets and secretary to the Church Board of Education. He served in that role until his retirement in 1999.

Joseph M. Tanner (1859–1927) Born in Payson, Utah. Married to Jennie Harrington, Annie Clark, Josephine Snow, Carrie Preston, and Lydia Holmgreen; 24 children. He attended Brigham Young Academy as a student and later taught there. He served a mission to Europe and the Middle East from 1884 to 1887. Upon his return, he served as principal of Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah. In 1896 he was appointed as the president of Utah State Agricultural College, serving until 1900. In 1901 he succeeded Karl G. Maeser as superintendent of Church schools, in which position he served until his retirement in 1906.

Harvey L. Taylor (1894–1983) Born in Harrisville, Utah. Married to Lucelle Eliza Rhees; four children. He was a teacher in Weber and Summit Counties, Utah. In 1928 he was appointed president of Gila Junior College in Thatcher, Arizona. He accepted a position as superintendent of Mesa Union High School in 1933 and was later appointed superintendent of Mesa public schools, serving there until 1953. That year he was appointed vice president of Brigham Young University and vice chancellor of the Unified Church School System. Later, when the two organizations separated, he was appointed administrator of Church elementary and secondary schools. He retired in 1971. The Church Board of Education asked him to complete a history of Church schools, which he completed in 1971. The history was titled The Story of L.D.S. Church Schools but was never formally published.

Dale T. Tingey (1924– ) Born in Centerville, Utah. Married to Jeanette Dursteller; three children. He began teaching in 1950 in Cedar City, Utah. In 1952 he transferred to Brigham Young High School in Provo, Utah. In 1955 he moved to Pullman, Washington, to serve as the director of the institute adjacent to Washington State University. In 1957 he joined the faculty of the Religion Department at Brigham Young University. In 1958 he moved to Southern California to assist in establishing institute there. In 1960 he returned to Utah to serve as an assistant supervisor over seminaries. In 1968 he was called as president of the Southwest Indian Mission. In 1971 he began serving as the head of the Institute of American Indian Studies and Research at BYU (later renamed American Indian Services).

A. Theodore Tuttle (1919–1986) Born in Manti, Utah. Married to Marne Whitaker; seven children. Tuttle served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. He began teaching in 1946 in Menan, Idaho, and later taught in Brigham City, Kaysville, and Salt Lake City, Utah. He later moved to Reno, Nevada, to serve as an institute director. In 1953 he was appointed an assistant supervisor over seminaries and institutes, continuing in that role until 1958, when he was called as a member of the First Council of the Seventy.

Thomas L. Tyler (1940– ) Born in Compton, California. Married to Marcia Brandon; eight children. He married Cheri Sweetland in 2004. He began work in the Church Curriculum Department in 1967, serving there until 1975. From 1975 to 1977 he worked in the Office of the Presiding Bishopric. From 1978 to 1982 he served as area director of the U.S. Northwest Area, and from 1982 to 1983 he was an area director in Nevada. In 1983 Tyler was called as president of the Texas San Antonio Mission. Upon his return he served as the area director in Nevada again, from 1986 to 1990. In 1990 he was called as a zone administrator, a position he held until his retirement in 2002.

Alton L. Wade (1934– ) Born in Leamington, Utah. Married to Diana Daniels; eight children. After earning degrees from Brigham Young University and California State University, Long Beach, he served as a teacher and as a vice principal at the Church College of New Zealand (CCNZ). In 1967 he was appointed principal of CCNZ. He served there until 1971, when he returned to BYU to complete a PhD. In 1972 he was appointed administrator for all Church schools in the Pacific. In 1977 he was appointed zone administrator. He served in that position until 1980, when he was appointed president of Dixie College. In 1986 he became president of BYU–Hawaii, where he served until 1994. From 1994 to 2000 he served as vice president of student life at BYU. After his retirement in 2000 he served as mission president for the Washington D.C. South Mission.

C. Malcolm Warner (1935– ) Born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Married to Helen Marchant; four children. He began teaching early-morning seminary in Kitchener, Ontario, in 1966. In 1970 he served as a part-time supervisor in the Indian Seminary Program and started an institute program associated with the University of Guelph, where he was on the chemistry faculty. In 1971 he was hired full-time as the seminary coordinator for southern Ontario and established more institute programs. In 1978 he was appointed associate area director for the Canada East Area. The following year he became the area administrator there. Over the next 14 years he served in different area administrative capacities in Canada and the United States. In 1994 he was invited to serve as a zone administrator. In 1997 he was called as a mission president in Oakland, California. Upon his return in 2000, he taught institute in Ogden, Utah, for one year until his retirement. From 2002 to 2005 he presided over the Toronto Ontario Temple with his wife, after which he served as a stake patriarch and a sealer in the Toronto Ontario Temple.

Chad H Webb (1964– ) Born in Rexburg, Idaho. Married to Kristi Ann Bronson; six children. He began teaching seminary in 1990 in Magna, Utah. He transferred to Taylorsville, Utah, in 1997. In 1998 he moved to Washington, D.C., to serve as a coordinator and institute director. In 2002 he began serving as a teacher and preservice trainer at the Ogden, Utah, institute. In 2003 he joined the central office as director of preservice training. In 2006 he was invited to serve as an assistant administrator. In 2008 he was appointed administrator of Seminaries and Institutes of Religion.

Harold F. Western (1928– ) Born in Deseret, Utah. Married to Mary Lou Robinson; 13 children. He began his career as a professor in the accounting department at Brigham Young University and as a businessman. In 1973 he was appointed associate commissioner over finance and budgets for the Church Educational System. In 1989 he was appointed secretary to the Church Board of Education in addition to his responsibility as commissioner over finance and budgets. He continued in these roles until his retirement in 1994.

Franklin L. West (1885–1966) Born in Ogden, Utah. Married to Gladys Spencer; two children. After Gladys’s death, he married Violet Madsen, and after her death he married Sarah Frances Nelson Malmborg. He served as a professor of physics and dean of faculty at Utah State Agricultural College (later Utah State University) for 28 years. In 1936 he was appointed Church commissioner of education. He authored several textbooks for use in seminary classrooms and served as commissioner until his retirement in 1953.

A. Bryan Weston (1942– ) Born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Married to Joanne Smith; 11 children. He began teaching seminary in 1966. In 1967 he moved to Montana to serve as an institute director and pursue graduate studies at Montana State University. In 1971 he moved to Moscow, Idaho, to serve as institute director there. In 1976 he was appointed area director for the Northern Plains Area. In 1981 he was asked to serve as a zone administrator, and over the next 22 years he supervised the work in Europe, Africa, South America, and the Pacific. In 2000 he became an executive assistant to Administrator Stanley A. Peterson and later to Administrator Paul V. Johnson. In 2002 he was called as president of the Oregon Portland Mission. He retired upon his return in 2005.

John A. Widtsoe (1872–1952) Born on the island of Frøya in Sør-Trøndelag, Norway. Married to Leah Dunford; seven children. He immigrated to the United States in 1883 and was baptized the same year. He attended Brigham Young College, in Logan, Utah. He later attended Harvard University and earned master’s and doctorate degrees from Goettingen University in Germany. He was appointed director of the Agricultural Experiment Station at Utah Agricultural College in 1900. In 1905 he joined the faculty of Brigham Young University. He was appointed president of Utah State University in 1907 and later became president of the University of Utah. In 1921 he was called as an Apostle and was appointed Church Commissioner of Education; he served in that role until 1924. He served as President of the European Mission from 1926 to 1932. He was appointed Church Commissioner of Education again from 1934 to 1936. He continued to serve as an Apostle until his death in 1952.

R. Scott Wilde (1968– ) Born in Encino, California. Married to Sherry Simkins; six children. He began teaching seminary in 1992 in Taylorsville, Utah. In 2007 he was assigned as the principal of the seminary in Layton, Utah. Four years later he was invited to serve as the area director for the Utah Davis Area. In 2012 Brother Wilde joined the central office as an assistant administrator with responsibilities covering the Asia, Asia North, Pacific, and Philippines Areas and continues in that position at the time of this publication.

Chad R. Wilkinson (1964– ) Born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Married to Alison Ford; four children. He began teaching seminary in 1990 in Taylorsville, Utah. In 1999 he became a seminary principal in Murray, Utah. In 2003 he started teaching institute in Orem, Utah. One year later he was appointed assistant area director in the Utah Valley South Area. In 2005 he was appointed as area director of the Salt Lake Valley West Area. Two years later he joined the central office staff as an assistant administrator, serving until 2012, when he was called as president of the Costa Rica San Jose Mission.

Ernest L. Wilkinson (1899–1978) Born in Ogden, Utah. Married to Alice Ludlow; five children. After attending Weber Academy and Brigham Young University, he received a law degree from George Washington University. After a successful legal career he was invited to serve as president of BYU in 1950. In 1953 he was appointed administrator and chancellor of the Unified Church School System, continuing to serve simultaneously as president of BYU. He served in both capacities until 1964, when he left to run for the United States Senate. He lost his senate bid and returned to BYU, serving as president of the university until his retirement in 1971.

Dan J. Workman (1929– ) Born in Vernal, Utah. Married to Barbara Gibbons; nine children. He joined Church education in 1958, teaching seminary in Cedar City, Utah. In 1960 he moved to Pullman, Washington, to serve as an institute director. After completing a PhD there, he was appointed institute director of the Moscow, Idaho, institute in 1962. In 1965 he moved to the Logan, Utah, institute, where he became the institute director in 1966. In 1970 he was invited to serve as an assistant administrator and later zone administrator in the central office. In 1987 he was called as the president of the newly created New Jersey Morristown Mission. Upon his return in 1990 he again served as an institute director in Orem, Utah. In 1993 he was sent to Europe to serve as area director of the Mediterranean Area, where he spent one year as a CES employee before he retired and an additional year as a CES missionary. He later presided over the Vernal Utah Temple with his wife from 1999 to 2002.