Doctrine and Covenants 133

Doctrine and Covenants and Church History Seminary Teacher Resource Manual, (2001), 227–29


Introduction

Though located near the end of the Doctrine and Covenants, section 133 was received November 3, 1831, just two days after section 1. This revelation originally served as an appendix to the Doctrine and Covenants.

One of the main purposes of this dispensation is to prepare people for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. President Harold B. Lee said that Doctrine and Covenants 133 is a “step-by-step recounting of events leading up to the coming of the Savior” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1972, 128; or Ensign, Jan. 1973, 106).

Some Important Gospel Principles to Look For

  • When Jesus Christ returns to the earth at the Second Coming, the ungodly will be destroyed as if by fire, while the righteous will be blessed beyond comprehension (see D&C 133:1–17, 38–45, 62–74).

  • Jesus Christ will reign over all the earth during the Millennium. His capitals will be the old Jerusalem and the New Jerusalem (see D&C 133:18–25).

  • Israel will bring forth her rich treasures (scriptures) unto the children of Ephraim (see D&C 133:30–34).

  • Many signs and wonders will occur before the Savior’s return. These signs fulfill prophecy and help prepare the righteous for His return (see D&C 133:19–64; see also D&C 45:35–44).

Additional Resources

  • Church History in the Fulness of Times: Religion 341–43, p. 119.

  • Doctrine and Covenants Student Manual: Religion 324–325, pp. 335–43.

Suggestions for Teaching

Doctrine and Covenants 133:1–17, 38–45, 62–74. When Jesus Christ returns to the earth at the Second Coming, the ungodly will be destroyed as if by fire, while the righteous will be blessed beyond comprehension.

(25–30 minutes)

Ask students if any of them have ever gone to a class at school and realized they had a test for which they had not prepared. Ask: How well did you do on the test? Invite them to describe their feelings. Now have them describe the test at school for which they prepared the longest and hardest. Ask: What difference did your preparation make? Invite them to name the hardest and most important school test they will take and the one they most want to be prepared for.

Read Doctrine and Covenants 133:1–4 and ask:

  • What future “test” do these verses refer to?

  • According to verse 4, how can we prepare for it?

Have students read verses 5–17 and mark words and phrases that describe how we can prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. Invite them to share what they found.

Write on the board D&C 133:38–45 and D&C 133:62–74. Explain that these verses represent two groups of people at the time of the Second Coming. Invite half the class to read the first set of verses, and the other half to read the second. Have them look for answers to the following questions:

  • What group is described in your verses?

  • What will the group you read about experience during the Second Coming?

  • Why will they have these experiences?

  • Which group would you rather be part of?

  • What must you do to be part of that group?

Have each group choose someone to report their findings to the class.

Read verses 4, 10, 15, 17, 19, 50 and ask: What do these verses have in common?

Discuss with students what they think is the best way to prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. Share the following statement by Elder Delbert L. Stapley, who was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve:

“Let us be sure we thoroughly understand the most important things we can do to prepare ourselves for our Lord’s second coming to earth. …

“… We must set our lives and homes in order. This means a searching of our souls, an admittance of wrongdoing, and repentance where needed. It means keeping all of God’s commandments. It means loving our neighbor. It means living an exemplary life. … It means being honest in all our doings, in business and at home. It means spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ to all the peoples of the world” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1975, 71; or Ensign, Nov. 1975, 49).

Doctrine and Covenants 133:18–25. Jesus Christ will reign over all the earth during the Millennium. His capitals will be the old Jerusalem and the New Jerusalem.

(15–20 minutes)

Ask students:

  • Where do the officials for our city or town meet to do their work?

  • In what city do our state or provincial lawmakers meet?

  • What is our nation’s capital city?

  • Have laws always been made in these places?

  • Will they always be made there?

  • From where will the laws of God go forth during the Millennium?

Have students read Doctrine and Covenants 133:18–25, 56 and look for where the Lord will rule from during the Millennium.

Write the following questions on the board or give copies to students as a handout. Have them search the references to answer the questions.

  1. 1.

    Where is “Mount Zion” located? (D&C 133:18; see the cross-reference in footnote 18b).

  2. 2.

    Who are the “hundred and forty-four thousand”? (D&C 133:18; see D&C 77:11).

  3. 3.

    Who is the “Bridegroom”? (D&C 133:19; see D&C 65:3).

  4. 4.

    Where is “Zion”? (D&C 133:21; see D&C 57:2–3).

  5. 5.

    How far is that from Jerusalem now? (see D&C 133:21; Bible map 13; Church history maps 6–7).

  6. 6.

    How will the lands of Jerusalem and Zion change at the Second Coming? (see D&C 133:24).

  7. 7.

    Who will rule the world during the Millennium? from what location? (see D&C 133:25; see also Isaiah 2:3).

Share the following statement by President Joseph Fielding Smith, who was then President of the Quorum of the Twelve:

“Jerusalem of old, after the Jews have been cleansed and sanctified from all their sin, shall become a holy city where the Lord shall dwell and from whence he shall send forth his word unto all people. Likewise, on this continent, the city of Zion, New Jerusalem, shall be built, and from it the law of God shall also go forth. There will be no conflict, for each city shall be headquarters for the Redeemer of the world, and from each he shall send forth his proclamations as occasion may require” (Doctrines of Salvation, 3:69–70).

Ask:

  • What do you imagine it will be like to have Jesus Christ personally reign on the earth?

  • How do you think the laws of the land might change as a result of the Lord’s rule during the Millennium?

  • What advantages do you think there will be to raising a family during the Millennium?

Doctrine and Covenants 133:22–64. Many signs and wonders will occur before the Savior’s return. These signs fulfill prophecy and help prepare the righteous for His return.

(30–35 minutes)

Bring some pictures depicting different seasons of the year. Hold up the pictures one at a time and ask students:

  • At what time of year was this picture taken?

  • What are the signs in the picture that tell you what time of year it was?

  • Are there enough signs in the picture to tell you the exact date it was taken?

Invite students to name a few signs of the Second Coming of Jesus Christ (you could list their answers on the board). Ask:

Give students copies of the accompanying chart as a handout (leave the right-hand column blank). Invite students to study Doctrine and Covenants 133:22–56 and list signs and wonders that will occur before or during the Second Coming.

Ask:

  • How do these signs affect the way you feel about the Second Coming?

  • What advantages are there to knowing the signs of the Second Coming?

  • What can you do to be more familiar with these signs?

  • How can we find out about other signs of the Second Coming? (Study the scriptures and the words of the prophets.)

Share the following statements. Elder Boyd K. Packer, then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve, said:

“The Brethren, by virtue of traveling constantly everywhere on earth, certainly know what is going on and by virtue of prophetic insight are able to read the signs of the times. …

“Come away from any others. Follow your leaders, who have been duly ordained and have been publicly sustained, and you will not be led astray” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1992, 102; or Ensign, Nov. 1992, 73).

Elder Bruce R. McConkie wrote:

“In our day we look forward with hope and joy to the Second Coming of the Son of Man, and to the setting up of the millennial kingdom of peace and righteousness, over which he shall assume personal rule for the space of a thousand years. We do not know and shall not learn either the day or the hour of that dreadful yet blessed day. We are expected to read the signs of the times and know thereby the approximate time of our Lord’s return and to be in constant readiness therefor” (The Promised Messiah: The First Coming of Christ [1978], 457).