Introduction

The Life and Teachings of Jesus and his Apostles, Instructor’s Guide (Rel 211–12), (2000), 1–8


One who teaches another is engaged in a noble profession; but one who teaches another about the life and teachings of the Master is engaged in a sacred work. It is the privilege of the teacher to invite the student to step upon hallowed ground as they learn of their Redeemer and Savior.

This instructor’s guide contains two separate studies under one cover. The first part is designed to assist the students in developing a personal, intimate relationship with their Savior. The latter explores the dynamic world of the early apostles, while helping the student to understand those Christlike qualities so essential to happiness and joy.

However, unlike many teaching manuals, this supplement will not give the instructor a detailed outline and a step-by-step set of instructions to guide him through each lesson. No two classes in the Church are ever the same. The needs, experiences, maturity, and responses of the students will vary tremendously from situation to situation, from location to location. Curriculum materials designed and produced centrally can and should determine subject matter to be taught and specific content areas that need emphasis. But it is the teacher who has been given the stewardship to determine how the materials are actually taught in his classroom. He must prepare, adapt, and present the materials so that they meet the needs of his particular setting and students. Thus, this teacher’s supplement and the course materials have been designed to prepare teachers for lessons rather than lessons for teachers.

The Lord has not left the teacher without special aid in the fulfilling of his stewardship. Two important guidelines for those who teach the gospel are given in the scriptures.

1. Teach by the Spirit. In D&C 42:14, the Lord said: “And the Spirit shall be given unto you by the prayer of faith; and if ye receive not the Spirit ye shall not teach.” A few months later, the Lord made it clear how important this qualification is. “Verily I say unto you, he that is ordained of me and sent for to preach the word of truth by the Comforter, in the Spirit of truth, doth he preach it by the Spirit of truth or some other way? And if it be by some other way it is not of God.” (D&C 50:17, 18.)

Who can, of himself, discern the spiritual problems, the emotional needs, and the mental readiness of every student that sits before him each day? Such a task is beyond human ability. But the Spirit has that capability and can direct the responsive teacher to say things or use a story or make a special emphasis that will touch the heart of a student in particular need. One of the thrills of gospel teaching is to have a student come, sometimes after much time has elapsed, and say, “I was fasting and praying for an answer, and what you said was the answer to my prayers.” The imparting of special inspiration in answer to an individual’s unspoken needs is not the only function of the Spirit. In the daily experience of the classroom, only when the Holy Ghost bears witness to what the teacher is saying will the teaching have true spiritual impact. Without the Spirit we fail.

2. Treasure up the words of life. The second injunction adds an important dimension to teaching by the Spirit. One teacher was heard to say, “Well, I don’t have anything prepared for today, so I guess I’ll go in and teach by the Spirit.” He did not seem to understand the charge given by the Lord when he said: “… treasure up in your minds continually the words of life, and it shall be given you in the very hour that portion that shall be meted unto every man.” (D&C 84:85.) Treasuring up the words of life constitutes the most important part of a teacher’s preparation and involves a consistent and substantive study of the words of the Lord as given through his prophets. Elder Joseph Fielding Smith summed it up thus:

“Treasuring up his word is far more than merely reading it. To treasure it one must not only read and study, but seek in humility and obedience to do the commandments given, and gain the inspiration which the Holy Spirit will impart.’” (Doctrines of Salvation, 1:305.)

When such a program of personal preparation takes place, then the teacher can and will be directed by the Spirit of the Lord as he prepares and teaches each lesson.

The course materials for The Life and Teachings of Jesus and His Apostles (including the student manual and the instructor’s guide) have been designed to help you treasure up the words of life so that you can more effectively teach by the power of the Spirit. The diagram below illustrates the materials available for both teacher and student.

Course Texts for Religion 211-212

As in almost every course, the most important text for Religion 211-212 will be the four standard works. In addition, certain books, which are included in what is called the “basic library,” are being made available to all teachers. This will give them the words of the modern prophets to study as they prepare their lessons. Though the list may vary in some areas or in some languages, the books listed below will probably be included in the basic library.

In addition to the basic sources, there is a course manual used by both the teacher and student and a teacher supplement for the teacher exclusively. A description of the materials found in the course manual is given in the introduction of the manual itself. The teacher should study that carefully before beginning the semester’s instruction.

The abbreviations in the left-hand column are used throughout the teacher study guides of the teacher supplement where reference is made to these books in the basic library.

The Basic Library

CR

Conference Reports, 1970 to the present.

(Note: In languages other than English, only talks by the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve, and the Patriarch of the Church are included.)

Teachings

Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, compiled by Joseph Fielding Smith

Discourses

Discourses of Brigham Young, compiled by John A. Widtsoe

Gos. Doc.

Gospel Doctrine, Joseph F. Smith

DS

Doctrines of Salvation, Joseph Fielding Smith (3 vols.)

M of F

The Miracle of Forgiveness, Spencer W. Kimball

Jesus the Christ

Jesus the Christ, James E. Talmage

A of F

Articles of Faith, James E. Talmage

The students should be encouraged to have the four standard works. The following diagram illustrates the materials generally available for both teachers and students:

for the teacher

The Instructor’s Guide

Each lesson in the instructor’s guide consists of one sheet printed on both sides. The first part provides a study guide for the teacher; the second part, some suggestions of methods that have been used by other teachers in presenting this lesson.

Theme

In a brief sentence the objective of the lesson is summarized. This provides the content theme that is to be taught.

Theme Analysis

The theme is analyzed in a brief outline, providing additional concepts supporting the basic lesson objective.

Study Sources

This portion of the guide contains study guidelines which are divided into the following four categories: (1) “Course Manual”—indicates where the reading assignment relating to this lesson is found in the manual; (2) “Standard Works”—indicates sources containing important references from the scriptures which apply to the theme of this lesson; (3) “Basic Library”—refers to books containing references that provide in-depth information on the particular subject matter area; (4) “Additional Sources”—lists enrichment references which may be studied if they are available but which are not absolutely essential to the presentation, how the lesson is to be presented.

for the student

Some Suggestions for Presentation

The second part contains ideas suggested by other teachers for presenting the lesson material. These suggestions are not necessarily keyed to specific parts of the lesson but are given to provide some ideas that may be useful as you prepare your own lesson. The teacher should feel free to adapt these suggestions to his own situation or to develop and create methods of his own. In this way the lessons will be individualized to fit his own students. All methods included here are only suggestive, and the teacher should feel free to use only those he finds valuable. Teachers should remember that this is not a sequential outline of how the lesson is to be presented.

for the teacher

How to Use the Course Manual

A study of the life and teachings of Christ, containing twenty-eight chapters for a one-semester (one and a half quarters) course.

A study of the world of the early apostles, containing twenty-eight chapters

The Instructor’s Guide and the Course Manual

In every case, the lesson numbers of the instructor’s guide correspond to the chapter numbers of the course manual. The themes are identical. Each quote or paragraph in the Study Resources has been given its own individual number, such as 1-5 (the fifth reading in chapter one) or 13-2 (the second reading in chapter thirteen). Teachers may wish to assign students readings other than those given to students in the course manual. These numbers should make it easier to make such assignments and to use the manual in class.

for the teacher

Adapting the Course Materials to Quarter, Semester, or IS Use

The majority of students in the Church Educational System are on a semester system, although many students are on a quarter system, and still others participate in individual study programs where courses take a full year. The following information should be helpful as teachers adapt the materials to their situation:

1. The average semester provides approximately twenty-eight sessions in which formal class instruction is given; the average quarter provides eighteen sessions. Individual study classes usually meet weekly for about eight months. With tests and other class activities, this gives IS students from twenty-eight to thirty class meetings.

2. This New Testament study is made up of two parts, either of which can be used as a separate course for one semester or one quarter. However, if used together, they would occupy a full year’s study (two semesters or three quarters). (See diagram above.)

3. Teachers will note as they examine the lessons that often some areas of content are more important than others. Some concepts are so important, for example, that two or three lessons may be devoted to them.

4. The teacher should feel free to adapt the lessons to his own time requirements, expanding some lessons into two or more sessions if necessary or combining two or more lessons into one presentation.

5. The following adaptation schedule could be used to teach a one-quarter course.

Religion 211

Lesson Number Semester

Lesson Title

Lesson Number Quarter Adaptation

1

“I Am the Way”

1

2

The Promised Messiah

2

3

The Son of the Eternal Father

3

4

“Behold the Lamb of God”

3

5

“Ye Must Be Born Again”

4

6

“This Is He of Whom It Is Written”

5

7

The Calling of the Twelve

5

8

“Be Ye Therefore Perfect”

6

9

“Whosoever Shall Do the Will of the Father”

6

10

“He Spake Many Things unto Them in Parables”

7

11

“He That Receiveth Whomsoever I Send Receiveth Me”

7

12

“I Am the Bread of Life”

8

13

That Which Defiles a Man

8

14

The Transfiguration of Christ

9

15

“I Am the Light of the World”

10

16

The Two Great Commandments

10

17

Where Much Is Given, Much Is Required

11

18

“Rejoice with Me; for I Have Found the … Lost”

12

19

“What Lack I Yet?”

12

20

The Triumphal Entry

13

21

“Woe unto You … Hypocrites!”

13

22

“What Shall Be the Sign of Thy Coming?”

14

23

“As I Have Loved You”

15

24

“My Peace I Give unto You”

15

25

“Not My Will, but Thine, Be Done”

16

26

“I Find No Fault in This Man”

17

27

“He Is Risen”!

17

28

“I Know That He Lives”

18

Religion 212

Chapter

Semester

Lesson Title

Lesson Number Quarter Adaptation

29

1

“Ye Are My Witnesses, Saith the Lord”

1

30

2

“God Is No Respecter of Persons”

2

31

3

“A Chosen Vessel unto Me”

3

32

4

“I Have Set Thee to Be a Light of the Gentiles”

3

33

5

The Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ

4

34

6

“That Your Faith Should Not Stand in the Wisdom of Men”

5

35

7

“This Do in Remembrance of Me”

5

36

8

“Covet Earnestly the Best Gifts”

6

37

9

“Affliction Worketh in Us a More Exceeding Weight of Glory”

6

38

10

“Whatsoever a Man Soweth, That Shall He Also Reap”

7

39

11

“Man Is Justified by Faith”

8

40

12

Heirs of God, and Joint-Heirs with Christ

8

41

13

Elected Before the Foundations of the World

8

42

14

“As Thou Hast Testified of Me in Jerusalem, so Must Thou Bear Witness Also at Rome”

10

43

15

“Ye Are … Fellow Citizens with the Saints”

11

44

16

“Be Thou an Example of the Believers”

11

45

17

“I Have Fought a Good Fight, I Have Finished My Course, I Have Kept the Faith”

12

46

18

“Let Us Go On unto Perfection”

13

47

19

“By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified”

13

48

20

Faith: Evidence of Things Not Seen

14

49

21

“Pure Religion and Undefiled”

15

50

22

“For This Cause Was the Gospel Preached Also to Them That Are Dead”

15

51

23

“Partakers of the Divine Nature”

16

52

24

“Walk in the Light As He Is in the Light”

16

53

25

“For There Are Certain Men Crept In Unawares”

17

54

26

“The Revelation of Jesus Christ … unto His Servant John”

17

55

27

“The Kingdoms of This World Are Become the Kingdoms of Our Lord”

18

56

28

“Behold, I Come Quickly; and My Reward Is with Me”

18