Young Women Resource Guide 2010—Manual2

"Young Women Resource Guide 2010—Manual2," Young Women Resource Guide 2010 for Manual2, (2009)


Some lessons may be expanded to more than one week or reinforced in midweek activities to address the specific needs of your young women. Activity settings are a good way to apply and practice living gospel principles. Consider teaching lessons on the Savior during the Easter and Christmas seasons.

Lesson 1: Drawing Closer to Jesus Christ

Discussion Questions

  • When have I felt the Savior’s love for me? What were the circumstances?

  • What can I change in my life to draw closer to Jesus Christ?

Additional Resources

  • Robert D. Hales, “Gaining a Testimony of God the Father; His Son, Jesus Christ; and the Holy Ghost,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 29–32. Consider using this talk by Elder Hales as a replacement for the story.

  • Dennis B. Neuenschwander, “One among the Crowd,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 101–3.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 40.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 4.

  • Prepare a picture of the Savior for each young woman to use at home or school as a reminder of the lesson. (Note: Church magazines are good sources for pictures.)

Lesson 2: Spiritual Gifts

Discussion Questions

  • How can I identify what my spiritual gifts are?

  • How can I celebrate other peoples’ gifts, rather than be threatened by them?

  • How can I use my spiritual gifts to bless the lives of others?

Additional Resources

  • Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “Happiness, Your Heritage,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 117–20.

  • Jeffrey R. Holland, “The Ministry of Angels,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 29–31.

  • Susan W. Tanner, “Daughters of Heavenly Father,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 106–9.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 165–67.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 40.

  • Moroni 10:8–17; Doctrine and Covenants 46:8–33.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Individual Worth value experience 7.

  • The week after this lesson is taught, the young women could be invited to share what they did to strengthen their spiritual gifts or how they were able to share their gifts with others. An appropriate time to do this could be at the beginning of class.

Lesson 3: Building the Kingdom of God

Discussion Questions

  • What examples of sacrifice have I observed in the lives of people I know? What have I learned from these examples?

  • What sacrifices have I made for something of greater worth?

  • What have I learned from my own sacrifices?

Additional Resources

  • Quentin L. Cook, “Hope Ya Know, We Had a Hard Time,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 102–6.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 149–50.

  • Matthew 19:16–22.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value experience 6.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 32–33.

Lesson 4: Obeying Commandments Helps Us Fulfill Our Divine Roles

Discussion Questions

  • What motivates me to stay true to gospel principles even when it is unpopular to do so and I have to stand alone?

  • Why should I be obedient to the Lord even though I don’t always understand why?

  • When has my life been blessed by keeping a specific commandment?

Additional Resources

  • Gordon B. Hinckley, “Let Virtue Garnish Thy Thoughts Unceasingly,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 115–17.

  • Henry B. Eyring, “Walk in the Light,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 123–25.

  • M. Russell Ballard, “Daughters of God,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 108–10.

  • Alma 57:21; Helaman 3:35; Doctrine and Covenants 64:34.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 2; Divine Nature value project, bullet 3; Individual Worth value experience 2.

Lesson 5: Home Environment

Discussion Questions

  • How can I help my family create a home environment where the Spirit can dwell?

  • What homemaking skills and life skills do I need to learn to make home life less stressful and to increase my family’s sense of well-being? In what ways will learning these skills help me in my future home?

Additional Resources

  • Susan W. Tanner, “Stand as a Witness,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 113–15. Consider sharing the story about the gift of faith that Sister Tanner’s mother possessed and how it influenced Sister Tanner’s life.

  • Mary N. Cook, “Strengthening Home and Family,” Nov. 2007, 11–13.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 10–11.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value project, bullets 1, 4; Integrity value experience 7.

  • Invite the young women to share or demonstrate a homemaking skill or life skill they worked on during the week. This could be done on a weekday activity or at the beginning of class the following week.

Lesson 6: Sharing Work in the Home

Discussion Questions

  • How has doing my share of the work been a blessing to others in my home?

  • How does my attitude affect my work? How does my attitude about helping at home impact my family’s attitudes about work?

  • How could I use my time more wisely to contribute more to the work in my home?

Additional Resources

  • Kenneth Johnson, “Restoring Faith in the Family,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 15–17.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 10–11.

  • Alma 36:25; Doctrine and Covenants 58:27.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Knowledge value project, bullets 1, 5; Choice and Accountability value project, bullet 5; Good Works value experiences 1–2; Good Works value project, bullet 2.

  • At the beginning of class the following Sunday, you could ask the young women to report on a task they performed during the prior week without being asked.

Lesson 7: Living in Love and Harmony

Discussion Questions

  • What experiences have I had where I was treated in a Christlike manner? What were the results of these experiences?

  • What are some ways Christ would have me treat my family? How would this affect my family?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “To Learn, to Do, to Be,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 60–62, 67–68.

  • Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Life’s Lessons Learned,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 45–47.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 6.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 5; Individual Worth value experience 3; Good Works value experience 5.

Lesson 8: Improving Communication Skills

Discussion Questions

  • What prevents me from communicating effectively with my family?

  • How does technology help and hinder effective communication with my family?

  • How can I improve communication between my parents and me?

Additional Resources

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 3.

  • Have each young woman select a standard in For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), and have her initiate a discussion with her parents on that subject.

Lesson 9: A Young Woman as a Peacemaker in Her Home

Discussion Questions

  • What could bring the spirit of peace into my home?

  • What am I doing to bring peace and harmony to my family?

  • How can I be a peacemaker among my ward family, especially among the young women in our class?

Additional Resources

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 7.

Lesson 10: The Priesthood: A Great Blessing

Discussion Questions

  • Who in my life has been an example of a worthy priesthood holder? Why?

  • What blessings do I have in my life because of the priesthood?

  • How do young men become qualified to receive priesthood power? How can I help them become and remain worthy of this sacred trust?

Additional Resources

  • Richard G. Scott, “Honor the Priesthood and Use It Well,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 44–47.

  • Jeffrey R. Holland, “Sanctify Yourselves,” Ensign, Nov. 2000, 38–40. Consider sharing Elder Holland’s story of the newly ordained elder.

  • Keith B. McMullin, “God Loves and Helps All of His Children,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 75–78. Consider replacing the story of the soldier at the start of the lesson with Bishop McMullin’s story of the little girl who had been hit by a bus.

Experience

  • Invite a newly married couple (approved by the bishop) to share with young women how the priesthood blesses their marriage and family.

Lesson 11: Appreciating the Bishop

Discussion Questions

  • What is the role of my bishop or branch president in my life?

  • Why is it important that I have a good relationship with my bishop or branch president?

  • When and how can the bishop or branch president help me with the repentance process?

Additional Resources

  • Henry B. Eyring, “Your Friend the Bishop,” New Era, Oct. 2002, 10–13.

    “Memories of interviews long ago with my bishop still guide me. He tried hard to teach me all that he had been taught about the priesthood. When I had a last interview with him, years later, I realized that conversations with my bishop had become conversations with a friend. I hope that happens to you, too” (p. 13).

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet 2001), 26–27, 34–35.

  • Doctrine and Covenants 46:27; 58:17; 107:15, 68.

Experiences

  • Discuss the importance and significance of annual interviews with the bishop or branch president. Encourage all young women to attend these interviews.

  • During a midweek activity, invite each young woman to write a note of appreciation for her bishop or branch president and his family.

Lesson 12: Fathers’ Blessings

Discussion Questions

  • When are times I might ask my father or another priesthood holder for a blessing?

  • With what experiences have I felt the power of the priesthood through a blessing?

Additional Resource

  • True to the Faith (2004), 125. Read and discuss the section “Priesthood and the Family.”

Lesson 13: Patriarchal Blessings

Discussion Questions

  • Why would the Lord want me to have a patriarchal blessing?

  • How can I better understand and participate in the fulfillment of my blessing?

  • When and with whom is it appropriate for me to share my patriarchal blessing? (see True to the Faith [2004], 113).

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “Be Thou an Example,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2005, 112–15.

    “Help can come to you from many sources. One is your patriarchal blessing. Such a blessing contains chapters from your book of eternal possibilities. Read your blessing frequently. Study it carefully. Be guided by its cautions. Live to merit its promises” (p. 114).

  • Julie B. Beck, “You Have a Noble Birthright,” Ensign, May 2006, 106–8.

  • “About Patriarchal Blessings,” New Era, Mar. 2004, 32–35.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Individual Worth value experience 6.

Lesson 14: The Blessings of the Temple

Discussion Questions

  • What blessings can come into my life by attending the temple—now and in the future?

  • What can I do now to prepare to receive the blessings obtained in the temple?

  • How have I felt when I have been to sacred places like temples or temple grounds?

Additional Resources

  • Richard H. Winkel, “The Temple Is about Families,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2006, 9–11.

  • Silvia H. Allred, “Holy Temples, Sacred Covenants,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 112–14.

  • Doctrine and Covenants 109, 138.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 170–74.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Choice and Accountability value experience 6; Good Works value project, bullet 3; Virtue value experience 3.

Lesson 15: Temple Marriage

Discussion Questions

  • What can I do now to prepare for a temple marriage?

  • Why is it a commandment to have a temple marriage?

  • How would I explain to a friend the difference between a temple marriage and a civil marriage?

Additional Resources

  • Russell M. Nelson, “Celestial Marriage,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 92–94.

  • Elaine S. Dalton, “Stay on the Path,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 112–14.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 170–71.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value project, bullet 4; Integrity value experience 1.

Lesson 16: Journals

Discussion Questions

  • What would I want my posterity to know about my life that I could write in a journal?

  • Why is it important to include inspirational thoughts and sacred experiences in my journal?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “Abundantly Blessed,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 111–12. Consider using the experience about the journal of President Monson’s grandfather.

  • Henry B. Eyring, “O Remember, Remember,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 66–69.

Experience

  • Consider having each young woman take to Mutual an excerpt from a journal (her mother’s, her grandmother’s, another relative’s, or her own) and share lessons learned. (Note: Be sensitive to privacy issues.)

Lesson 17: Keeping Family History Records

Discussion Questions

  • What can I learn about my life as I learn about my ancestors?

  • What are different ways I can gather and compile my family history?

Additional Resources

  • M. Russell Ballard, “Faith, Family, Facts, and Fruits,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 25–27.

  • Quentin L. Cook, “Give Heed unto the Prophets’ Words,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 47–50. Consider sharing the story of the book that Elder Cook’s mother gave him.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 61–64.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Individual Worth value experience 5.

  • Encourage the young women to have a family home evening where they record important details about their own lives, learn about their ancestors, or complete a family pedigree chart.

Lesson 18: A Heritage of Righteous Traditions

Discussion Questions

  • What family traditions and practices strengthen my family?

  • What righteous traditions could I establish to strengthen my future family?

Additional Resources

  • Ronald A. Rasband, “Our Rising Generation,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2006, 46–48.

  • Cheryl C. Lant, “Righteous Traditions,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 13–14.

  • “The Family: A Proclamation to the World,” Ensign, Nov. 1995, 102.

  • Alma 57:21, 26–27; Helaman 5:12.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value experience 7; Good Works value experience 2.

Lesson 19: Preparing to Teach Others

Discussion Questions

  • What are the results of sharing the gospel with others?

  • In what ways can I share the gospel with others? How can I prepare for such opportunities?

Additional Resources

  • Erich W. Kopischke, Preach My Gospel—the Unifying Tool between Members and Missionaries,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 33–35.

  • William D. Oswald, “Gospel Teaching—Our Most Important Calling,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 95–98.

  • 2 Nephi 33:1; Mosiah 23:14; Doctrine and Covenants 88:77–80, 118.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Knowledge value project, bullet 4.

Lesson 20: Sharing the Gospel

Discussion Questions

  • How would I explain the Book of Mormon to a friend?

  • What barriers would keep me from sharing the gospel with others?

  • What gospel topics can I discuss with my nonmember friends?

Additional Resources

  • David A. Bednar, “Ask in Faith,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 94–97.

  • Gary J. Coleman, “Mom, Are We Christians?” May 2007, 92–94.

  • Silvia H. Allred, “Go Ye Therefore,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 10–12.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 104–6.

  • Mosiah 28:1–3; Doctrine and Covenants 88:81.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Good Works value experience 7.

  • Role-play situations where the young women share the gospel with their friends.

Lesson 21: Sustaining Missionaries through Letters

Teach lesson 21 as a midweek activity rather than during Sunday instruction. On Sunday, teach a lesson on virtue using the following resources:

Resources

  • Elaine S. Dalton, “A Return to Virtue,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 78–80.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 29–33.

  • Personal Progress: Virtue value experiences 1–4.

Lesson 22: Counseling with the Lord

Discussion Questions

  • What can I do to improve my prayers and prepare to receive answers?

  • What do I know about my Heavenly Father that encourages me to go to Him in prayer?

  • In what ways has Heavenly Father answered my prayers?

Additional Resources

  • Richard G. Scott, “Using the Supernal Gift of Prayer,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 8–11.

  • David A. Bednar, “Pray Always,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 41–44.

  • David A. Bednar, “Ask in Faith,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 94–97.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 118–23.

  • 2 Nephi 4:34–35; Alma 37:37.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Faith value experience 1; Choice and Accountability value experiences 1, 5; Integrity value experience 2.

Lesson 23: Fasting Brings Blessings

Discussion Questions

  • How could I explain to a friend the reasons why I fast?

  • How is fasting a part of repentance? (see True to the Faith [2004], 67).

Additional Resources

  • Joseph B. Wirthlin, “The Law of the Fast,” Ensign, May 2001, 73–75; Liahona, July 2001, 88–91.

    “Fasting, coupled with mighty prayer, is powerful. It can fill our minds with the revelations of the Spirit. It can strengthen us against times of temptation. … Fasting and prayer can help develop within us courage and confidence. It can strengthen our character and build self-restraint and discipline. Often when we fast, our righteous prayers and petitions have greater power. Testimonies grow. We mature spiritually and emotionally and sanctify our souls. Each time we fast, we gain a little more control over our worldly appetites and passions. … Fasting and prayer can help us in our families and in our daily work. They can help us magnify our callings in the Church” (Ensign, 73; Liahona, 88).

  • Mosiah 27:22; Alma 5:46; 6:6; 17:3, 9.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value experience 6.

Lesson 24: Revelation in Our Daily Lives

Discussion Questions

  • What barriers keep me from being in tune with the Spirit?

  • In what ways do promptings of the Spirit come?

  • What results have I experienced when I have acted upon a prompting?

Additional Resources

  • Robert D. Hales, “Personal Revelation: The Teachings and Examples of the Prophets,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 86–89.

  • Gerald N. Lund, “Opening Our Hearts,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 32–34.

  • DVD, On the Lord’s Errand (2008; item 08043 090), biography of President Thomas S. Monson.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Choice and Accountability value experience 5; Integrity value experience 2.

  • Review sections from For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), identifying the blessings of the Holy Ghost that are received by being obedient to these standards.

Lesson 25: The Law of Sacrifice

Discussion Questions

  • What examples of sacrifice have I observed in the lives of people I know? How have these sacrifices blessed my life?

  • What are the purposes and benefits of sacrifice?

Additional Resources

  • D. Todd Christofferson, “Come to Zion,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 37–40. Share Elder Christofferson’s story of the table.

  • Lynn G. Robbins, Tithing—a Commandment Even for the Destitute,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2005, 34–36. Consider using the following quotation at the conclusion of the lesson:

    “The story of the widow of Zarephath is an example of extreme poverty used to teach the doctrine that mercy cannot rob sacrifice any more than it can rob justice. In fact, the truer measure of sacrifice isn’t so much what one gives to sacrifice as what one sacrifices to give (see Mark 12:43). Faith isn’t tested so much when the cupboard is full as when it is bare. In these defining moments, the crisis doesn’t create one’s character—it reveals it. The crisis is the test” (p. 34).

  • True to the Faith (2004), 149–50.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 34–35.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Faith value experience 3.

  • You could take the first few minutes of class to discuss the following question: How have you expressed gratitude to your parents or someone close to you for a sacrifice they made on your behalf?

Lesson 26: The Sacrament

Discussion Questions

  • What does it mean to partake of the sacrament worthily? How does taking the sacrament relate to my baptism?

  • How can I prepare for the sacrament, and what can I do during the sacrament to make it more meaningful?

  • How can consistently partaking of the sacrament every week bless my life?

Additional Resources

  • Dallin H. Oaks, “Sacrament Meeting and the Sacrament,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 17–20.

  • D. Todd Christofferson, “Born Again,” May 2008, 76–79.

  • Jay E. Jensen, “Arms of Safety,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 47–49.

  • Luke 22:19–20; 1 Corinthians 11:23–29; 3 Nephi 18:1–12.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 147–49.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Faith value experience 4; Divine Nature value experience 4; Virtue value experience 4.

Lesson 27: Strengthening Testimony through Obedience

Discussion Questions

  • How does obedience lead to a stronger testimony of the gospel?

  • What are some ways I can influence my friends and family members to be more obedient?

  • How can I strengthen myself when those around me choose not to obey the commandments?

Additional Resources

  • Robert R. Steuer, “The Power of Light and Truth,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 99–101.

  • Spencer J. Condie, “Claim the Exceeding Great and Precious Promises,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 16–18.

  • Carlos A. Godoy, “Testimony as a Process,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 100–102.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 108–9.

  • Matthew 7:24–27; 1 Nephi 3:7; Alma 31:5; Helaman 5:12.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value experience 1.

  • Write your testimony or review the testimony you have written in your Personal Progress guidebook or in your journal.

Lesson 28: Agency

Discussion Questions

  • What rewards or blessings have I received from making correct choices?

  • How does keeping the commandments give me more freedom? How does disobedience take away my freedom?

  • What do I need to do or change in my life so that it is easier to choose the right?

  • What are some ways my choices affect the lives of others?

Additional Resources

  • Gerald N. Lund, “Opening Our Hearts,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 32–34.

    “Individual agency is so sacred that Heavenly Father will never force the human heart, even with all His infinite power. Man may try to do so, but God does not. To put it another way, God allows us to be the guardians, or the gatekeepers, of our own hearts. We must, of our own free will, open our hearts to the Spirit, for He will not force Himself upon us” (p. 33).

  • True to the Faith (2004), 12.

  • 2 Nephi 2:27–28; Helaman 14:30–31; Doctrine and Covenants 101:78.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Choice and Accountability value experiences 1–3.

  • Have the young women role-play answers to the questions youth may receive regarding their choices and their reasons for living gospel standards.

Lesson 29: Exaltation

Discussion Questions

  • What ordinances have I received and what ordinances are still needed for me to achieve exaltation?

  • If repentance allows me to come back, why should I worry now about staying on the path to exaltation?

Additional Resources

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Faith value experience 6.

  • Encourage the young women to practice the invitation given by the Young Women presidency in the January 2009 New Era and Liahona regarding the Mutual theme to “Be thou an example of the believers” (1 Timothy 4:12). Invite the young women to report back on how prayer, reading the Book of Mormon, and smiling helped them stay on the path to exaltation.

Lesson 30: Strengthening Testimony through Service

Discussion Questions

  • What simple acts of service have others done for me this week?

  • In what ways can I serve my family and others?

  • How can one righteous young woman impact the world?

Additional Resources

  • Steven E. Snow, “Service,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 102–4.

  • Silvia H. Allred, “Go Ye Therefore,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 10–12. Consider using Sister Allred’s story of her conversion to help answer question 3 listed above.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 38.

  • Matthew 22:35–40; 25:40–46; Luke 10:25–37; Mosiah 2:17.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value project, bullet 2.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 161–62. Plan and carry out an act of service. Consider ideas for serving your family, ward, or community.

Lesson 31: The Law of the Land

Discussion Questions

  • Why is it important that I am aware of and participate in community issues? (see Mosiah 29:25–32).

  • What civil laws am I asked to obey, and how can my example in obeying these laws affect the actions of others?

  • What is my responsibility when I see others disobeying the laws?

Additional Resources

Experience

  • During a Mutual activity, learn more about the laws youth are asked to live. Consider role-playing situations related to the third question above.

The next five lessons relate directly to the standards in For the Strength of Youth. Help the young women understand what the doctrine and prophetic words are that support these standards, and help them understand how following gospel standards will help them in their daily lives.

Lesson 32: The Importance of Life

Discussion Questions

  • How does understanding my role as a woman in the divine process of creation affect the way I live my life and care for my body?

  • How do I explain to my friends my belief that all life is sacred and that abortion is a sin? What are the exceptional circumstances that justify abortion? (see True to the Faith [2004], 4).

Additional Resources

  • Russell M. Nelson, “Abortion: An Assault on the Defenseless,” Ensign, Oct. 2008, 32–37; Liahona, Oct. 2008, 14–19.

  • “The Family: A Proclamation to the World,” Ensign, Nov. 1995, 102 (paragraphs 4–5).

  • True to the Faith, 4–5, 7–8, 26. Consider replacing the quotations about abortion and the story about Cindy with the information in True to the Faith.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 2.

  • For a Mutual activity, go with the young women to a place of natural beauty and discuss the Creation and the gift of life.

Lesson 33: The Sacred Power of Procreation

Discussion Questions

  • What blessings can I have from staying morally pure?

  • What are the small decisions I can make that will guard me against the temptation of immorality?

Additional Resources

  • Gordon B. Hinckley, “I Am Clean,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 60–62.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 26–27.

  • “The Family: A Proclamation to the World,” Ensign, Nov. 1995, 102. Consider using passages from the proclamation to replace President Hugh B. Brown’s quotation at the beginning of the lesson and the final quotations listed in the lesson.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Virtue value experience 1.

  • Role-play situations where young women explain the Lord’s standards of chastity and virtue to others.

Lesson 34: Hold Fast to the Lord’s Standards

Discussion Questions

  • How can I help my friends keep the Lord’s standards?

  • The world asks me to be tolerant of everyone’s actions and beliefs. In what circumstances does the Lord ask me to make judgments of ideas, situations, and people? (see True to the Faith [2004], 90–91).

  • How does my example in living the Lord’s standards affect how others feel about the Church?

Additional Resources

  • W. Craig Zwick, “We Will Not Yield, We Cannot Yield,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 97–99.

  • Elaine S. Dalton, “A Return to Virtue,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 78–80.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value experience 5.

  • Read Alma 47. Discuss how we can be “poisoned by degrees,” ending in a failure to live the Lord’s standards.

Lesson 35: Wise Choices

Discussion Questions

  • What are the choices I am making as a young woman that will affect me throughout the rest of my life?

  • When has the Holy Ghost helped me to make a wise choice?

  • How are my choices impacting others?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “Finding Joy in the Journey,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 84–88.

  • Henry B. Eyring, “Walk in the Light,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 123–25.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 4–5.

  • Moroni 7:16–17.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Individual Worth value experience 2.

Lesson 36: Honesty

Discussion Questions

  • What does it mean to be honest?

  • When in my life am I tempted to be dishonest?

  • How are some people in the world living a double life?

  • What are the blessings of making my actions consistent with my beliefs “at all times and in all things, and in all places”? (Mosiah 18:9; see True to the Faith [2004], 84).

Additional Resources

  • Richard C. Edgley, “Three Towels and a 25-Cent Newspaper,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2006, 72–74.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 31.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Integrity value experiences 2, 4.

  • Have a joint discussion with young men and young women on honesty, integrity, and how to help one another avoid the worldly trap of living dual lives.

Lesson 37: Maintaining Chastity through Righteous Living

Discussion Questions

  • What does the media teach about chastity?

  • Why are sexual sins considered “extremely serious”? ( For the Strength of Youth [pamphlet, 2001], 26–27).

  • What decisions do I need to make now to help me remain chaste and worthy for future temple blessings?

Additional Resources

  • Richard G. Scott, “The Sanctity of Womanhood,” Ensign, May 2000, 36–38; Liahona, July 2000, 43–45.

  • Elaine S. Dalton, “Stay on the Path,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 112–14.

  • For the Strength of Youth, 26–27.

  • 2 Nephi 28:20–22; Mosiah 4:29–30; Alma 39:3–5.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Choice and Accountability value project, bullet 3; Virtue value experience 1.

Lesson 38: Physical Health

Discussion Questions

  • How does the notion of moderation apply to physical health and well being (such as nutrition, exercise, and sleep)?

  • How can maintaining physical health help me fulfill my divine roles?

  • What am I doing to maintain a healthy body? What can I improve?

Additional Resources

  • James E. Faust, “The Power to Change,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 122–24. This article by President Faust could be used to address addictions.

  • L. Tom Perry, “Let Him Do It with Simplicity,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 7–10.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 36–37.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Knowledge value project, bullet 3.

  • Provide an opportunity for the young women to learn about nutritious meal planning and preparation.

Lesson 39: Preventing Disease

This lesson may be used as the basis of a Mutual activity. Consider inviting a physician or nurse to visit with the young women about current health issues and practical helps to maintain a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease. Or consider inviting a physical and mental health care professional to discuss eating disorders, addictions, and other issues facing your young women.

Lesson 40: Self-Mastery

Discussion Questions

  • What habits have the prophets asked us to develop that exhibit self-mastery? (see For the Strength of Youth [pamphlet, 2001], 40–42). What are the promises related to these habits?

  • How can Personal Progress be a tool to help me develop self-mastery?

Additional Resources

  • Bruce C. Hafen, “The Atonement: All for All,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2004, 97–99.

    “We grow in two ways—removing negative weeds and cultivating positive flowers. The Savior’s grace blesses both parts—if we do our part. First and repeatedly we must uproot the weeds of sin and bad choices. It isn’t enough just to mow the weeds. Yank them out by the roots, repenting fully to satisfy the conditions of mercy. But being forgiven is only part of our growth. We are not just paying a debt. Our purpose is to become celestial beings. So once we’ve cleared our heartland, we must continually plant, weed, and nourish the seeds of divine qualities” (p. 97).

  • Charles W. Dahlquist II, “Who’s on the Lord’s Side?” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 94–96.

Experience

  • Invite the young women to practice the standards outlined on page 40 of For the Strength of Youth for a week. Consider having them share at the beginning of class the following week the differences they felt in their lives as they participated in these activities.

Lesson 41: Optimism

Discussion Questions

  • What do I know about God’s plan of salvation that can help me have an optimistic attitude about life?

  • What can I do to stay cheerful and optimistic during challenging times?

  • What are the blessings of having a cheerful countenance?

Additional Resources

  • Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Come What May, and Love It,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 26–28.

  • Quentin L. Cook, “Hope Ya Know, We Had a Hard Time,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 102–6.

  • 2 Nephi 31:20; Ether 12:4–9, 23, 27.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Faith value experience 6; Individual Worth value experience 1.

Lesson 42: Gratitude and Appreciation

Discussion Questions

  • What gifts and opportunities has the Lord given me? How would my life be different without these blessings?

  • How does expressing gratitude to others and to God bless me?

  • How do I show gratitude to my parents, my friends, my Heavenly Father, and others?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “Finding Joy in the Journey,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 84–88. Read the story of the woman who was blind and had her sight restored.

  • Bonnie D. Parkin, “Gratitude: A Path to Happiness,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 34–36.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 78–79.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 6.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Good Works value experience 1.

  • Write letters of appreciation or thank-you notes to teachers, parents, friends, or leaders.

Lesson 43: Wise Use of Leisure Time

Discussion Questions

  • What activities do I do that could be considered a waste of time?

  • What choices could I make to use my leisure time more wisely?

  • Why am I accountable to the Lord for how I spend my time? (see For the Strength of Youth [pamphlet, 2001], 4–5).

Additional Resources

  • M. Russell Ballard, “Daughters of God,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 108–10.

  • Dallin H. Oaks, “Good, Better, Best,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2007, 104–8.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 40.

  • For the Strength of Youth, 4–5.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Knowledge value experience 2.

  • Invite the young women to share how they used some of their free time during the week to develop a talent or learn something new.

Lesson 44: Developing Talents

Discussion Questions

  • What does Heavenly Father expect me to do with my talents and spiritual gifts?

  • What new talents or skills do I want to develop? Who could teach me?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “The Spirit of Relief Society,” Ensign, May 1992, 100–102.

    “Every woman has been endowed by God with distinctive characteristics, gifts, and talents in order that she may fulfill a specific mission in the eternal plan” (p. 101).

  • Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “Happiness, Your Heritage,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2008, 117–20.

    “You may think you don’t have talents, but that is a false assumption, for we all have talents and gifts, every one of us” (p. 119).

  • True to the Faith (2004), 165–67.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Individual Worth value experiences 4, 7; Knowledge value experience 5.

  • Find out new skills the young women want to develop, and match the young women up with sisters in Relief Society who have those skills and are willing to teach them.

Lesson 45: Participating in the Cultural Arts

Have the young women plan and participate in an activity focusing on cultural arts. Give them an opportunity to develop and share their skills and talents or to learn the etiquette associated with enjoying the arts at museums, concerts, or other events in your area.

Lesson 46: Financial Responsibility

Discussion Questions

  • What are the dangers of buying something now and paying for it later?

  • What can I do to avoid going into debt?

  • Why is paying tithing an act of faith?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “True to the Faith,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2006, 18–21.

  • Keith B. McMullin, “Lay Up in Store,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2007, 51–53.

  • True to the Faith (2004), 48–49.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Knowledge value experience 2; Choice and Accountability value experience 7.

  • Consider having a joint Young Men–Young Women discussion on debt, credit cards, interest, banking, and other financial matters. Encourage the youth to make a list of their financial needs over the next few years until their adulthood and make a plan to meet those needs.

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 34–35.

Lesson 47: An Uplifting Environment

Discussion Questions

  • What do I need to add to or eliminate from my living space that would help me have a more uplifting environment?

  • How can media spiritually pollute my life? What should I do to improve my media environment?

Additional Resources

  • James E. Faust, “Spiritual Nutrients,” Ensign and Liahona, Nov. 2006, 53–55.

    “Spiritual nutrients, which keep us spiritually healthy, can lose their potency and strength if we do not live worthy of the divine guidance we need. … We need to keep our minds and bodies clean from all forms of addiction and pollution. We would never choose to eat spoiled or contaminated food. In the same selective way, we should be careful not to read or view anything that is not in good taste. Much of the spiritual pollution that comes into our lives comes through the Internet, computer games, television shows and movies that are highly suggestive of or graphically portray humanity’s baser attributes. Because we live in such an environment, we need to increase our spiritual strength” (p. 55).

  • Richard G. Scott, “How to Live Well amid Increasing Evil,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2004, 100–102.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Divine Nature value experience 3; Choice and Accountability value experience 5; Choice and Accountability value project, bullet 2; Virtue value experience 2.

Lesson 48: Communication Skills in Leadership

Discussion Questions

  • What are the dangers of communicating over the Internet or by texting rather than speaking face-to-face with someone?

  • In what ways will effective communication skills be valuable in my future marriage, jobs, and callings? What skills do I need to work on?

  • What attributes did Christ have that would help me be a better leader and communicate more effectively?

Additional Resources

  • Thomas S. Monson, “Examples of Righteousness,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 65–68.

  • L. Lionel Kendrick, “Christlike Communications,” Ensign, Nov. 1988, 23–24. Replace the lesson’s opening demonstration with a discussion of Christlike communication as described in the following quotation:

    “Christlike communications are expressed in tones of love rather than loudness. They are intended to be helpful rather than hurtful. They tend to bind us together rather than to drive us apart. They tend to build rather than to belittle” (p. 24).

  • For the Strength of Youth (pamphlet, 2001), 22–23.

Experience

  • Personal Progress: Good Works value experience 4; Choice and Accountability value project, bullet 3.

Lesson 49: Valuing and Encouraging People with Disabilities

Discussion Questions

  • What character traits or skills do I have or need that will help me serve those with disabilities?

  • What could I do to help someone with a disability feel useful and needed, appreciated and wanted?

  • What have I learned from those who have disabilities?

Additional Resources

  • Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Concern for the One,” Ensign and Liahona, May 2008, 17–20.

  • Mosiah 4:15.

Experiences

  • Personal Progress: Good Works value experiences 3, 6; Divine Nature value project, bullet 2.

  • Consider learning how to do sign language for “I Am a Child of God” (Hymns, no. 301) or another Church hymn.