As is usually the case, there were many great and inspired talks given at October General Conference.

There were many important pronouncements, and we invite all readers to examine the December Ensign (adult magazine of the Church) for the full annual conference report. All of the addresses are reprinted in it.

For the past several conferences we have printed excerpts from the addresses that had the most to do with youth and their problems. We depart from that pattern this time and reproduce in full two talks that we know will be of interest to New Era readers.

The first is by Elder Richard L. Evans, who spoke on the ten commandments. After Elder Evans had finished his talk, President Harold B. Lee of the First Presidency commented on its greatness and timeliness for youth. We had planned to print this talk anyway. But with Elder Evans’ death, this great talk takes on even more importance: it is the last major address ever given by Elder Evans. Of late it has become fashionable for school groups to sponsor what is called a “Last Lecture” series. Persons invited to speak are to say those things that they would like to say if this were the last talk they would ever give. Knowing how deeply Elder Evans loved youth, it is appropriate in his last major address that he should speak primarily to youth—and those who heard him know that Elder Evans spoke as if he were bearing an urgent testimony. In many ways, this “last lecture” is a masterpiece. Not only will it live on for many years to come, but it will do what Elder Evans intended: change many peoples’ lives.

The second talk is by Dr. James O. Mason, commissioner of health services for the Church. In his address Brother Mason reviewed a recent decision of the First Presidency to have Latter-day Saints serve other kinds of missions! There are many members of the Church throughout the world who need help—medical, dental, engineering, agricultural—all sorts of help. The Church is going to become involved in this need. This is a fantastic idea and one that excites everyone. You’ll want to read the full text of Dr. Mason’s address.