The Bulletin Board


Keeping You Posted

Girls’ Camp in Ghana

A boarding school might seem like an unusual place for girls’ camp, but it was the perfect place for these young women from the Accra Christiansborg (Ghana, Africa) Stake to spend some time getting to know each other better.

The location wasn’t the only unusual thing about the camp. Although there were about 100 girls at camp participating in the usual activities—knot tying, crafts, swimming, and games—it was unique because this is the first ever girls’ camp held in West Africa.

Seminary Saves the Day

Kelly Landrum of Nashville, Tennessee, had a problem. She attends a private, nondenominational Christian school and is one of just a handful of Church members in a school that has students from kindergarten to high school. In some of the discussions during her classes and mandatory chapel services held every week, some things were said about the Church that weren’t true.

“I made an appointment with the principal to ask if we could have the missionaries speak at one of our chapel services,” says Kelly.

The principal didn’t allow Kelly to invite the missionaries, but he did ask her several questions about the Church that she was able to answer competently and confidently. The conversation helped both of them understand each other a little better, and Kelly feels that he was really impressed with her testimony, even if he doesn’t agree with her.

“I remembered lots of things I learned in seminary in the past,” she says. “I pay a lot closer attention in seminary now than ever before. You never know when something you learn might come in handy!”

Brazil’s Best

Diana Borges (above in red) is the only Latter-day Saint in the private all-girls school she attends in her home town of Curitiba, Brazil. Being the only member at school can be a bit tough sometimes. But Diana has a secret weapon to keep her testimony strong and her spirits up: daily seminary attendance.

“Being together with my friends at seminary every day keeps me going,” she says. The other students in her seminary class (also above) agree. Since they all go to different schools, they cherish their time together.

Stamping Out Hate

This stamp “encourages the world to have hearts full of love and peace for everyone. Our world is so full of wars and hate that to encourage love, peace, and harmony seems to be a great message.”

These were the words of an essay by 12-year-old Lance Howard, deacons quorum president in the Clinch River Ward, Knoxville Tennessee Cumberland Stake. Lance’s essay about his favorite postage stamp won him first place in the U.S. Postal Service’s “Celebrate the Century” essay contest for east Tennessee.

The postmaster in Powell, Tennessee, was especially moved by Lance’s words: “Not often do we see the powerful message coming from this age group as there is in his essay.”