What is the significance of Pioneer Day? Is it celebrated all over the Church?
    Footnotes

    “What is the significance of Pioneer Day? Is it celebrated all over the Church?” Liahona, July 2010, 47

    What is the significance of Pioneer Day? Is it celebrated all over the Church?

    Pioneer Day commemorates the arrival of the first group of Mormon pioneers to the Salt Lake Valley, on July 24, 1847. In Utah it is an official state holiday, and the associated celebration, including a parade, is referred to as Days of ’47. It is a time for recognizing all people who have contributed to building the state, regardless of religion or background.

    In addition, Latter-day Saints in various locations worldwide may join in recognizing the pioneer heritage we all share. Some communities hold pageants, parades, concerts, and handcart treks as part of the commemoration. Elsewhere, the remembrance may be as simple as a family outing or a personal moment of reflection. No matter where Church members live, no matter if there is a formal celebration or just a minute of thought, it is an appropriate time to remember what early Latter-day Saints did for us all, including local pioneers who strengthened the Church where you live.

    President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency, said: “What a joy and privilege it is to be part of this worldwide Church and be taught and uplifted by prophets, seers, and revelators! … As the message of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ is now being embraced around the world, we are all pioneers in our own sphere and circumstance.”1

    Note

    1. Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “Heeding the Voice of the Prophets,” Liahona, July 2008, 3; Ensign, July 2008, 5.