What the Church Teaches about Marriage


Hugh B. Brown, “The Latter-day Saint Concept of Marriage,” Liahona, June 2011

Marriage is and should be a sacrament. The word sacrament is variously defined, but among Christian people it signifies a religious act or ceremony, solemnized by one having proper authority. It is a pledge, or solemn covenant, a spiritual sign or bond between the contracting parties themselves and between them and God.

Russell M. Nelson, “Celestial Marriage,” Liahona, Nov. 2008

The proclamation on the family helps us realize that celestial marriage brings greater possibilities for happiness than does any other relationship.

“Strengthening the Family: The Family Is Central to the Creator’s Plan,” Liahona, Dec. 2004

We must take our place on the front line in this war that began in the premortal world and do all we can to preserve and protect the sanctity of the family.

Boyd K. Packer, “The Standard of Truth Has Been Erected,” Liahona, Nov. 2003

However out of step we may seem, however much the standards are belittled, however much others yield, we will not yield, we cannot yield.

“The Divine Institution of Marriage,” mormonnewsroom.org

The Church’s opposition to same-sex marriage neither constitutes nor condones any kind of hostility towards homosexual men and women. Protecting marriage between a man and a woman does not affect Church members’ Christian obligations of love, kindness and humanity toward all people.

“Strengthening the Family: Multiply and Replenish the Earth,” Liahona, Apr. 2005

The blessings of keeping God’s command to rear children are some of the sweetest blessings He offers. Indeed, in many ways parenthood gives us a foretaste of godhood.

L. Tom Perry, “A Solemn Responsibility to Love and Care for Each Other,” Liahona, June 2006

The subject I have been assigned is the following sentence from the proclamation on the family: “Husband and wife have a solemn responsibility to love and care for each other and for their children.”

Sheri L. Dew, “It Is Not Good for Man or Woman to Be Alone,” Liahona, Jan. 2002

No marriage or family, no ward or stake is likely to reach its full potential until husbands and wives, mothers and fathers, men and women work together in unity of purpose.

David A. Bednar, “Marriage Is Essential to His Eternal Plan,” Liahona, June 2006

We have been counseled strongly by the First Presidency to devote our best efforts to the strengthening of marriage and the home. Such instruction has never been more needed in the world than it is today, as the sanctity of marriage is attacked and the importance of the home is undermined.

Russell M. Nelson, “Nurturing Marriage,” Liahona, May 2006

Marriages would be happier if nurtured more carefully.

F. Burton Howard, “Eternal Marriage,” Liahona, May 2003

If you want something to last forever, you treat it differently. … It becomes special because you have made it so.

Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Marriage That Endures,” Liahona, July 2003

God bless you, that as you look forward to or contemplate your marriage, you may look not only for rewarding companionship and rich and fruitful family relationships through all of your mortal days, but to an even better estate where love and treasured associations may be felt and known under a promise given of God.

James E. Faust, “Enriching Your Marriage,” Liahona, Apr. 2007

In the enriching of marriage, the big things are the little things. There must be constant appreciation for each other and thoughtful demonstration of gratitude. A couple must encourage and help each other grow. Marriage is a joint quest for the good, the beautiful, and the divine.

Spencer W. Kimball, “Oneness in Marriage,” Liahona, Oct. 2002

The mere performance of a ceremony does not bring happiness and a successful marriage. This requires forgetting of self, continued courting, and obedience to the Lord’s commandments.

W. Douglas Shumway, “Marriage and Family: Our Sacred Responsibility,” Liahona, May 2004

In a society where marriage is often shunned, parenthood avoided, and families degraded, we have the responsibility to honor our marriages, nurture our children, and fortify our families.