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Youth Menu

Celebrate by Cooking

Cooking outdoors has always been a part of camp.

“Your three meals a day are an important little procession which may bring you no end of pleasure and sturdy comfort. For so much of your fun in camp depends upon your health and that, in turn, upon your food” (Camp Bulletin, 1930).

Girls in the camp were assigned certain days to prepare nutritious, well-balanced, easy-to-prepare, tasty meals. They tried out the menus at home before going to camp.

At the very early camps, cooking utensils and dishes were kept in a large box hung in a tree.

A Beehive requirement from the 1915 handbook reads: “Without help or advice, do all the camp cooking for one day, for four or more persons. Get the wood; furnish suitable character and amounts of food; write the menu, quantities and price of food.”

A Variety of Cooking Methods

At camp, girls learned stick cookery, on-the-rock cookery, one-pot dishes, baking in a reflector oven, baking in the bean hole, baking on a plank, and cooking on a spit. 

Ring Tum Diddy is a “one-pot dish” recipe from the early years of camp.

The Bean Hole

Another cooking requirement was to make a bean hole at least 18x18 inches and cook beans for one meeting of the Beehives.

Ring Tum Diddy (a one-pot dish)

You will need:

  • A frying pan, a spoon, a knife, and a board
  • 1 can corn
  • 3 onions
  • 1 large green pepper
  • 8 slices toast or crackers
  • 3 small tomatoes
  • 1/4 lb. bacon
  • 1/4 lb. American cheese
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 can tomatoes

Dice and fry out the bacon; wash, seed, and cut up the pepper; peel and slice the onions thin and add to the bacon. Then add the tomatoes and corn. Season the toast. Just before serving, add the cheese. Serve hot on toast or crackers.

Try some vintage recipes at your camp this year.

 

Download a printable PDF of this article, which includes more recipes.

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