Time Is a Fluid Condition
    Footnotes

    “Time Is a Fluid Condition,” Ensign, Mar. 1980, 59

    Time Is a Fluid Condition

    It is not always possible for us to control all of our time. There are those inevitable, lengthened moments when we must bear sad news or when we are separated from loved ones, or when treasured plans are set aside. But even those moments can be meaningful if we are good to time: what better time is there to read a poem or to talk to God in prayer?

    The story is told of a productive writer who travels widely. He always keeps a paper and pencil handy, and when others are wishing away minutes on long flights or agonizing over missed connections, he is making notes for his next book. He loves time. And time is good to him. To this man meaningful time is not just writing and traveling; it also includes teaching, raising a fine family, being active in church, business, and government.

    Inevitably time does “slip away.” For some it simply disappears and leaves nothing. For others, when time is gone, monuments remain.

    J. Spencer Kinard, “The Spoken Word”