Parables of the Lost and Found
    Footnotes

    “Parables of the Lost and Found,” Ensign, Feb. 2011, 46–51

    Parables of the Lost and Found

    As the Savior’s undershepherds, we have the responsibility to “reach out and rescue those who have fallen by the wayside.”

    In chapter 15 of the Gospel of Luke, the Savior uses three parables to teach the worth of a soul, showing us how to find and return that which is lost to the fold of faith and family.

    In the parables, the sheep wanders, the piece of silver is lost, and the prodigal son wastes his inheritance in riotous living. But the shepherd searches the wilderness, the woman sweeps the house, and the forgiving father watches for his son’s return, ever ready with an embrace and a warm welcome home.

    The Savior’s parables—and the three vignettes by Church leaders that follow—remind us that as His undershepherds, we have the responsibility to “reach out and rescue those who have fallen by the wayside, that not one precious soul will be lost.”1

    Note

    1. Thomas S. Monson, “Stand in Your Appointed Place,” Liahona and Ensign, May 2003, 57.

    Rescue of the Lost Lamb, by Minerva K. Teichert; illustrations by Robert A. McKay

    Lost Coin, by J. Kirk Richards

    The Prodigal Son, by Clark Kelley Price © IRI